Soviet Russian Dialectical Materialism (Diamat)

By J. M. Bochenski | Go to book overview

APPENDIX II*)

I. SUPPLEMENTS

to page 19: The Three Periods of Modern Thought in Western Europe

The thought of Western Europe has passed through three periods since the end of the Middle Ages (more precisely, since the late Renaissance). The first period, from the late Renaissance to the eighteenth century, is characterized by the deification of the secular -- the severing of philosophy, science, politics, art, etc. from the transcendent and sacred. In the 18th century, however, took place a movement in a, to some extent, opposite direction -- the secular, freed from the transcendent, was now deified. History, mankind, progress, even the universe was considered and felt to be holy. The speculative apex of this movement is in the philosophy of Hegel, but it is as well evident in the materialism, evolutionism and other trends of the nineteenth century. Finally, with the commencement of the twentieth century (with significant predeccessors such as Kierkegaard and Nietzsche already in the nineteenth century) begins a new trend -- the secular was desanctified -- thus a philosopher of the twentieth century can say: "the question as to whether there is a progressive evolution or not has no meaning for me because I must die". For the comprehension of Diamat it is absolutely essential to realize that it rises entirely from the second period.


to page 22: The Younger Marx and Diamat

Among researchers it is a universally recognized fact that Marx underwent a development in which at least two phases can be distinguished, the 'younger' and the 'older' Marx. The earlier period is marked by an attitude which is humanistic in the strict sense of the term -- the individual stands in the centre of Marx' thought and Marx, himself, is a convinced democrat. What is even of more importance is that it seems that the younger Marx, under the influence of Feuerbach, in a certain sense belongs to the pre-

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*
In this section the numbers in parentheses (not preceded by a letter) refer to the position in the Bibliographie der sowjetischen Philosophie (by Blakeley, etc.).

-129-

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Soviet Russian Dialectical Materialism (Diamat)
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Preface to the First Edition 1
  • Sources and Method 5
  • Historical Section 7
  • I. - The Western Origins 9
  • II. - The Russian Origins:Lenin 20
  • III. - The History of Philosophy in Soviet Russia 31
  • IV. - External Characteristics and Spirit 43
  • Systematic Section 55
  • V. - Definition and Classification of Philosophy 57
  • VI. - Realism and Rationalism 66
  • VII. - Materialism 74
  • VIII. - The Dialectic 82
  • IX. - Methodolgy:Applications 94
  • X. - Historical Materialism 98
  • XI. - The Value of Dialectical Materlialism as a Theory 106
  • XII. - Concluding Remarks 117
  • Appendix I 123
  • Appendix II 129
  • Readings 168
  • Bibliography 169
  • Subject-Index 178
  • Name-Index 182
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