The Life and Works of Thomas Paine - Vol. 7

By Thomas Paine; William M. Van der Weyde | Go to book overview

AN ESSAY FOR THE USE OF NEW REPUBLICANS IN THEIR OPPOSITION TO MONARCHY

THE attainment of any important possession that we have long been ardently coveting is at once a source of subsequent self-congratulation. Indeed, the feeling that we have triumphed so absorbs us that we immediately lose the sense of the cause of our success. But, after dwelling awhile on our new happiness, we verify all the incidents that have produced it, and the examination of each of them separately still further enhances our satisfaction. It is our present purpose to develop fully the reasons why our, readers should participate in our enjoyment.

THIS article first appeared in "Le Patriote François" of October 20, 1792. In it Paine occasionally repeats a sentence or a paragraph from his earlier writings, and re-presents his well- known anti-royalist principles.

Assembling on September 21, 1792, the National Convention first took steps to abolish Rovalty, and the next day established the revolutionary calendar. A few days after making public this essay Paine was delegated to felicitate the Convention, which he did in these words freely translated: "Citizen President: In behalf of my fellow- deputies and of the General Council of the Commune of Calais I have the honor of congratulating the Convention on the abolition of Royalty. At the same time, I must, in the midst of the popular rejoicing, express my regret that the folly of our ancestors should compel us to treat with such solemnity the laying of a phantom."

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