Chapter III
Still More Pre-Tom

EVERYTHING was going beautifully with love's young dream when, with appalling suddenness, international politics lifted its head and threw a bomb at the romance of Alejandro Ybarra and Nelly Russell.

As usual with revolutions in the South America of those disorderly days, the one that had landed Antonio Gruzmán Blanco in the presidency of Venezuela had caused financial loss to a number of foreigners, who forthwith bellowed loudly to their governments for redress. Included in this chorus were several Americans. They felt that they had been badly mulcted by the hostilities that had preceded the dictatorship of El Ilustre Americano. So they promptly put in claims for large numbers of dollars.

These claims were among the headaches besetting Thomas Russell as United States Minister to Venezuela. They had been dragging along throughout his tenure of office in Caracas. Finally, the State Department at Washington urged upon him the advisability of prompt action.

Thomas Russell was nobody's fool. Behind all the gaiety and courtesy of Caracas he knew perfectly well that political corruption lurked. He knew that feathering one's nest was looked upon by many local politicos as the main reason for holding office; that, as a nest-featherer, Guzmán Blanco was a cham-

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Young Man of Caracas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents xi
  • List of ILlustrations xiii
  • Chapter I- Pre-Tom 1
  • Chapter II- More Pre- Tom 19
  • Chapter III- Still More Pre-Tom 33
  • Chapter IV- Militarism! 52
  • Chapter V- More Militarism 67
  • Chapter VI- "Yessie" 84
  • Chapter VII- My Caracas 101
  • Chapter VIII- El Cedral 117
  • Chapter IX- Revolution 132
  • Chapter X- Under the Surface 148
  • Chapter XI- "Dips" and Others 162
  • Chapter XII- The Language of the Tribe 178
  • Chapter XIII- William Tell and Teresa 198
  • Chapter XIV- La Familia 212
  • Chapter XV- More of My Caracas 233
  • Chapter XVI- More Revolution 252
  • Chapter XVII- Early Business Life 265
  • Chapter XVIII- From Machete to Peinilla 279
  • Chapter XIX- Under Fire 293
  • Chapter XX- Customs of the Tribe 307
  • Chapter XXI- The Bostonian Returns 319
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 324

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.