Chapter XVI
More Revolution

I NEVER saw General Crespo, successor of Andueza Palacio, while he was President. This was because the relations between Crespo and my father were similar to those of the latter with Guzmán Blanco. In other words, Crespo's arrival anywhere was likely to be the signal for my father's departure for somewhere else.

But I saw much of another President of Venezuela, who succeeded Crespo: General Ignacio Andrade, whose administration lasted from 1897 until the autumn of 1899. Andrade, a man of peace, was sandwiched in between Crespo, who was a roughneck, and Castro, who was another.

Crespo ran Venezuela from 1892 to 1897. We spent that entire period in Munich or Massachusetts. Then Crespo relinquished the presidency to Ignacio Andrade, fully intending to pull the strings behind the scenes and come back to power later on, in the Guzmán Blanco fashion. But fate played Joaquin Crespo a dirty trick.

Andrade's entry into the Yellow House inspired El Mocho Hernández, that chronic revolutionist, to stage a rebellion against the new government. Crespo, the power behind the Andrade régime, sallied forth in command of the government forces to bring El Mocho to book. He established contact with the enemy somewhere on the plains south of Caracas and was

-252-

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Young Man of Caracas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents xi
  • List of ILlustrations xiii
  • Chapter I- Pre-Tom 1
  • Chapter II- More Pre- Tom 19
  • Chapter III- Still More Pre-Tom 33
  • Chapter IV- Militarism! 52
  • Chapter V- More Militarism 67
  • Chapter VI- "Yessie" 84
  • Chapter VII- My Caracas 101
  • Chapter VIII- El Cedral 117
  • Chapter IX- Revolution 132
  • Chapter X- Under the Surface 148
  • Chapter XI- "Dips" and Others 162
  • Chapter XII- The Language of the Tribe 178
  • Chapter XIII- William Tell and Teresa 198
  • Chapter XIV- La Familia 212
  • Chapter XV- More of My Caracas 233
  • Chapter XVI- More Revolution 252
  • Chapter XVII- Early Business Life 265
  • Chapter XVIII- From Machete to Peinilla 279
  • Chapter XIX- Under Fire 293
  • Chapter XX- Customs of the Tribe 307
  • Chapter XXI- The Bostonian Returns 319
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