The National Recovery Administration: An Analysis and Appraisal

By Leverett S. Lyon; Paul T. Homan et al. | Go to book overview

THE BROOKINGS INSTITUTION
The Brookings Institution-- Devoted to Public Service through Research and Training in the Social Sciences -- was incorporated on December 8, 1927. Broadly stated, the Institution has two primary purposes: The first is to aid constructively in the development of sound national policies; and the second is to offer training of a super-graduate character to students of the social sciences. The Institution will maintain a series of co-operating institutes, equipped to carry out comprehensive and interrelated research projects.The responsibility for the final determination of the Institution's policies and its program of work and for the administration of its endowment is vested in a self-perpetuating Board of Trustees. The Trustees have, however, defined their position with reference to the investigations conducted by the Institution in a by-law provision reading as follows: "The primary function of the Trustees is not to express their views upon the scientific investigations conducted by any division of the Institution, but only to make it possible for such scientific work to be done under the most favorable auspices." Major responsibility for "formulating general policies and co-ordinating the activities of the various divisions of the Institution" is vested in the President. The by-laws provide also that "there shall be an Advisory Council selected by the President from among the scientific staff of the Institution and representing the different divisions of the Institution."
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
NORMAN H. DAVIS
FREDERIC A. DELANO
CLARENCE PHELPS DODGE
JEROME D. GREENE
ALANSON B. HOUGHTON
ORTON D. HULL
VERNON KELLOGG
JOHN C. MERRIAM
HAROLD G. MOULTON
LESSING ROSENTHAL
LEO S. ROWE
HARRY BROOKINGS WALLACE
JOHN G. WINANT

OFFICERS
FREDERIC A. DELANO, Chairman
LEO S. ROWE, Vice-Chairman
HAROLD G. MOULTON, President
LEVERETT S. LYON, Executive Vice-President
HENRY P. SEIDEMANN, Treasurer

-ii-

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