The National Recovery Administration: An Analysis and Appraisal

By Leverett S. Lyon; Paul T. Homan et al. | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The somewhat unusual conditions under which this book has been written make appropriate a brief statement in connection with acknowledgments. This study began almost with the inception of the Recovery Administration itself. It hardly needs to be said that there were no data, no record of activities, not even a basis for forecasting with certainty the direction which NRA developments would take. On the other hand, there began almost immediately explosive activity of kaleidoscopic type. In part this activity was directed to the formation and re-formation of the NRA itself. Its structure was recast and again recast almost before any form was sufficiently determined for observation and description. No less shifting and varied were its other activities. The initiation of the code-making process, the emotionalism of the Blue Eagle campaign, and early enforcement efforts, followed one another and were in turn succeeded by other dramatic actions with a feverish haste which offered a minimum of opportunity for careful scrutiny and appraisal.

Even when the early phases of NRA history were passed the problem of calm study was sufficiently difficult. The NRA expended its energies upon problems of organization, code making and enforcement, and in coping with the political pressures under which it operated. It at no time made available to the public any full record of its operations.

The prosecution of the study under these peculiar circumstances has led to a wider and more varied range of

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