The National Recovery Administration: An Analysis and Appraisal

By Leverett S. Lyon; Paul T. Homan et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
THE APPROACH TO LABOR PROVISIONS
In the words of the President the National Industrial Recovery Act was passed to "put people back to work -- to let them buy more of the products of farms and factories and start our business at a living rate again." While industrial recovery was to be the first task, another task moved with it, that of planning a "better future for the longer pull." The labor provisions of the codes of fair competition reflect an attempt to carry out these two objectives. These provisions may be classified in terms of the following sub-objectives:
1. Limiting the hours of work to the end that available work may be shared among a greater number of workers.
2. Setting the minimum wage rates in an attempt to provide "living wages" for all and to enlarge the purchasing power of the lowest paid classes.
3. Making some arrangements for wage rates above the minimum --still with increased purchasing power as an objective.
4. Guaraziteeing the right of collective bargaining as stated in Section 70(a).
5. Abolishing child labor by setting a minimum age of 16 years, which was seldom qualified or decreased and was increased to 18 years in some industries or in hazardous occupations. Though not required by the act, this clause appears in ever
6. Making provision for various other situations by "special clauses." Some of these pertaining to stretch-out, consecutive work hours, etc., are peculiar to certain industries; others, such as provision that state laws apply where more stringent, have more general application.
7. Providing for statistical reporting not only of labor conditions but also of other factors in business operations. The specific

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