The National Recovery Administration: An Analysis and Appraisal

By Leverett S. Lyon; Paul T. Homan et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XV
CONTINUING ISSUES

The preceding three chapters have been concerned solely with an analysis of the structure of employment conditions under the codes. The scope of the analysis has not extended, except by inference, to the administrative problems involved. Nor has it covered the operative economic consequences in relation to the recovery objective.1 At this point a brief review of the analysis is expedient. This will be followed by a consideration of continuing problems both of administration and public policy.


STRUCTURAL COMPLEXITIES

In order to facilitate exposition, the earlier discussion has taken up separately the minimum wage structure, the higher brackets structure, and the hours structure. Operatively, of course, these are not separate and distinct; they are inter-woven and interacting parts of the hundreds of separate code structures of employment conditions. Furthermore, these total structures are not abstract entities; they are concrete instruments that are to be administered in the work-a-day business world, and their administration is to be supervised by another complex of governmental and quasi-governmental agencies.

In Chapter XII, it was seen that the minimum wage structure is an outgrowth of a wish to see every worker receive a living wage, and of a vaguely defined idea of the role of wage protection in stimulating business recovery. This outgrowth might have been simple, but it became very complex. In a situation where there was little objective information and less defined policy, there

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1
This subject is dealt with at length in Pt. VI.

-392-

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