The National Recovery Administration: An Analysis and Appraisal

By Leverett S. Lyon; Paul T. Homan et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXII
THE NRA PURCHASING POWER THEORYO

It would be a serious error to regard the NRA as a studied attempt to give institutional embodiment to an economic theory. It was primarily a plan of action to meet what was conceived to be an emergency. It respotided to concrete immediate objectives: to get idle workers on the payrolls of industry, to shorten hours, to raise wages, to put a "bottom" under prices, to outlaw "unfair competition," to abolish child labor. Theory was secondary to action, not action to theory.

It is in part for this reason that we have no formal official version of the economic doctrines underlying the NRA. There is instead an accumulation of public statements emanating from different government officials and varying widely in emphasis and completeness. To distill from these declarations anything approaching a clear-cut, well-reasoned, and consistent body of doctrine is patently impossible. For the most part they originated as propaganda dashed off in the campaign to "sell" the NRA to the public, and they reflect the confusion and incoherence characteristic of such material.

It need hardly be said that there is seldom in these statements any clear separation of the reform and the recovery aspects of the NRA program. In many cases it seems to have been simply assumed that recovery was a natural by-product of reform. The program itself, as we have pointed out in the preceding chapter, was essentially an embodiment of the long-standing reform proposals of organized labor and organized industry: higher wages, shorter hours, and collective bargaining on the one hand;

-756-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The National Recovery Administration: An Analysis and Appraisal
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 947

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.