The National Recovery Administration: An Analysis and Appraisal

By Leverett S. Lyon; Paul T. Homan et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXVII
THE NRA AND EMPLOYEE INCOME

The discussion of the effect of the NRA on employee income falls naturally into two parts, the one concerned with aggregate payrolls and the other with individual earnings.


EFFECT OF THE NRA ON AGGREGATE PAYROLLS

The NRA has affected the total wage and salary payments of industry in two ways: (1) by raising earnings per man hour; (2) by increasing or decreasing the total number of man hours worked. Let us consider these separately.

We have already presented an index of the average hourly earnings of all employees in the United States (see the chart on page 788). This shows a level shortly after the inauguration of the codes or the President's Agreement of roughly 10 per cent above the pre-NRA lows. This gain may be safely credited to NRA influence. How much of the advance occurring subsequent to 1933 may be attributed to this cause it is impossible to say. The further we recede from the transition period in the summer of 1933 the more the special effects of the NRA are submerged in the effects of other factors in the situation. It seems likely that average hourly earnings would have turned upward in 1934. without the codes.1

While changes in hourly earnings attributable to the

____________________
1
In the recovery from the previous major depression ( 1921) average hourly earnings in manufacturing (the only series available) did not begin to rise until some time after the turn in production, but within a year thereafter they were apparently advancing steadily. See Wages in the United States, 1914-1930, National Industrial Conference Board, p. 24.

-845-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The National Recovery Administration: An Analysis and Appraisal
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved in your active project from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 947

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.