Fighting Liberal: The Autobiography of George W. Norris

By Arthur M. Schlesinger; George W. Norris | Go to book overview

12
PAYNE-ALDRICH TARIFF BILL

MY EDUCATION in party government was continued in the House of Representatives through a course in tariff legislation.

In 1909 the Payne-Aldrich bill passed, and thereafter throughout my service in Congress I heard and participated in every debate which took place over a tariff law.

To the end of that period, there was virtually no change in the technique of tariff legislation. New duties might be proposed, or existing levies might be increased; but always the methods utilized bore a startling likeness, and the forces back of every measure were the same. The means taken to determine duties, the consideration and debate of those levies, and the passage of the bill either in its original or in its amended form, followed a fixed pattern, which had been polished until it glistened.

Recent years have brought much controversy over subsidies for favored groups or classes. Paternalism in government began with adoption of the high protective tariff principle. In its practical operations, the high protective tariff is a subsidy pure and simple though indirect; for the benefit conferred upon the producers of industrial commodities, through those tariff walls which Congress built higher and higher, exacting enormous profits from the consumers for the manufacturers, emcbodies the idea of a subsidy. In time, the insatiable appetite for higher tariffs was responsible for the most flagrant nationalism ever developed in this country.

I had barely emerged from the freshman class as a member of the House when what is known as the Payne-Aldrich tariff bill was being drafted.

-99-

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Fighting Liberal: The Autobiography of George W. Norris
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword George Norris and the Liberal Tradition v
  • Acknowledgment xvii
  • Introduction xxi
  • Contents xxv
  • Illustrations xxvii
  • 1 - An Ohio Farm 1
  • 2 - My Mother 9
  • 3 - Early Education 20
  • 4 - On to Valparaiso 29
  • 5 - The L.U.N. (lunatics Under Norris) 39
  • 6 - Washington Territory 46
  • 7 - A Law Practice 53
  • 8 - An Ardent Republican 59
  • 9 - Conceptions of Justice 69
  • 10 - Marriage and Home 78
  • 11 - Reluctant Decision 88
  • 12 - Payne-Aldrich Tariff Bill 99
  • 13 - The Unhorsing of Speaker Cannon 107
  • 14 - The Archbald Impeachment 120
  • 15 - The Party Rawhide 129
  • 16 - For the Grand Old Party 142
  • 17 - No Friendly Atmosphere 154
  • 18 - Hetch Hetchy 162
  • 19 - Death Kiss by Filibuster 173
  • 20 - Declaration of War 188
  • 21 - Defeat of the League 202
  • 22 - Senate Seat for Sale 214
  • 23 - Teapot Dome 224
  • 24 - Lonely Pilgrimage 234
  • 25 - A Second Emancipation 245
  • 26 - Tva in Existence 260
  • 27 - Relief for the Farmer 278
  • 28 - Grocer Norris"" 286
  • 31 - The Lame Duck Amendment 328
  • 32 - Unicameral Legislature 344
  • 33 - Limitations Upon Voting 356
  • 34 - America Taking Shape 368
  • 35 - Steps Toward Peace 379
  • 36 - Lend-Lease 390
  • 37 - Inflation 396
  • 38 - By Way of Farewell 401
  • Index 411
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