Fighting Liberal: The Autobiography of George W. Norris

By Arthur M. Schlesinger; George W. Norris | Go to book overview

34
AMERICA TAKING SHAPE

MUCH OF WHAT I had long dreamed took place in that ten-year sweep between 1930 and 1940.

Developments which had seemed fantastic to many became commonplace.

Old and familiar political battlecries mingled with new.

There is in this country a far more competent, effective, and judicial judgment upon national policy than that rendered by any single individual. It is the deliberate, considered will of the American people. It has not been their tradition to retreat. I served in Congress throughout the entire period when the most sweeping adjustments of national life came, with two possible exceptions: the period immediately following the Revolution, with the formulation of an American Bill of Rights, with judicial interpretation of the practical meaning of American freedom and independence; and the period which followed the Civil War, with the ultimate settlement of the West.

The course of American life has been impressive throughout all the years the nation temporarily rested upon the oars, or in those periods of crisis when great decisions were made.

Yet I think that the three eras to which I have referred generally will be recognized as the months and years of high controversy, so wholesome and so good for the spirit of democracy.

Among the little noted developments which have come to pass is the growth of nonpartisanship in the administration of government agencies. Its greatest efficiency will be attained only when Civil Service, or the merit system, is applied in genuine fashion to

-368-

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Fighting Liberal: The Autobiography of George W. Norris
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword George Norris and the Liberal Tradition v
  • Acknowledgment xvii
  • Introduction xxi
  • Contents xxv
  • Illustrations xxvii
  • 1 - An Ohio Farm 1
  • 2 - My Mother 9
  • 3 - Early Education 20
  • 4 - On to Valparaiso 29
  • 5 - The L.U.N. (lunatics Under Norris) 39
  • 6 - Washington Territory 46
  • 7 - A Law Practice 53
  • 8 - An Ardent Republican 59
  • 9 - Conceptions of Justice 69
  • 10 - Marriage and Home 78
  • 11 - Reluctant Decision 88
  • 12 - Payne-Aldrich Tariff Bill 99
  • 13 - The Unhorsing of Speaker Cannon 107
  • 14 - The Archbald Impeachment 120
  • 15 - The Party Rawhide 129
  • 16 - For the Grand Old Party 142
  • 17 - No Friendly Atmosphere 154
  • 18 - Hetch Hetchy 162
  • 19 - Death Kiss by Filibuster 173
  • 20 - Declaration of War 188
  • 21 - Defeat of the League 202
  • 22 - Senate Seat for Sale 214
  • 23 - Teapot Dome 224
  • 24 - Lonely Pilgrimage 234
  • 25 - A Second Emancipation 245
  • 26 - Tva in Existence 260
  • 27 - Relief for the Farmer 278
  • 28 - Grocer Norris"" 286
  • 31 - The Lame Duck Amendment 328
  • 32 - Unicameral Legislature 344
  • 33 - Limitations Upon Voting 356
  • 34 - America Taking Shape 368
  • 35 - Steps Toward Peace 379
  • 36 - Lend-Lease 390
  • 37 - Inflation 396
  • 38 - By Way of Farewell 401
  • Index 411
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