In Search of America: Transatlantic Essays, 1951-1990

By Marcus Cunliffe | Go to book overview

8
The Two Georges: The President and the King

A brief version of "The Two Georges' was presented in 1976 at a bicentennial degree-giving ceremony at the University of Pennsylvania. The notion that the presidency was also in some ways a monarchy has occurred to many people ever since 1789. Apart from my "Invention of the Presidency," mentioned on page 175, n. 25, I have paid some attention to the theme in various editions of a work first published in 1968, appearing in its most recent guise as The Presidency ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1987) -- for example, 382-86, and also in the essay reprinted in the present volume, "The Presidential Elections of 1789 and 1792."

George Tom Paine III "Royal Brute of Great Britain," received a great deal of abuse during his lifetime. In Common Sense Paine argued both that the king was a clod and that he was or aimed to be an autocrat. In the Crisis papers and in other writings Paine continued to jeer and fulminate. He would ( Crisis I, December 1776), "make a whore of my soul" if he were to swear allegiance to the "sottish, stupid, stubborn, worthless, brutish" George III, who on the day of judgment would seek to flee in terror when confronted by "the orphan, the widow, and the slain of America." Paine repeated the notion ( Crisis VI, October 1776) that at the final judgment George III would be consigned to hell.

Such violently accusatory language was typical of the war years. It was the theme of Jefferson's indictment in the Declaration of Independence ("A prince whose character is . . . marked by every act which may define a tyrant."). Benjamin Franklin, who delighted in hoaxes, concocted one in 1782, pretending to be John Paul Jones. There was however nothing playful in the remarks he

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In Search of America: Transatlantic Essays, 1951-1990
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.