In Search of America: Transatlantic Essays, 1951-1990

By Marcus Cunliffe | Go to book overview

14
Stephen Crane and the American Background of Maggie

In part this essay owes its origin to an hour spent in the basement of a secondhand bookstore in Manchester, England, back in the early 1950s. There I came across well-thumbed, cheap English editions of the American sermons of DeWitt Talmage, a celebrity in his day of whom I had never heard. The essay has been cited here and there and reprinted in a couple of collections of writings on Crane Maggie. As reprinted here, it excludes material from the beginning and end which now seems inessential. Feminist scholarship has reinterpreted some of the older attitudes, moral and economic, to the role of prostitution in American life. Some of this work amplifies and modifies the kinds of argument and evidence presented here. See, for example, Laura Hapke, Girls Who Went Wrong: Prostitutes in American Fiction, 1885-1917 ( Bowling Green, Ohio: Bowling Green State University Press, 1989).

I wish to take Stephen Crane as an example of an author who has been classified with a fallacious neatness. He is a difficult figure to deal with. His work is uneven, his talent precocious and dazzling. Largely on the strength of his first novel, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets ( 1893), Crane has been labeled as a naturalist. As such, he is supposed to have borrowed from other naturalists. Whatever he did not borrow from them, Crane is thought to have got from his own direct experience or to have absorbed at second-hand from the experiences of others (in the case of his Red Badge of Courage, from the experiences of Civil War veterans). Naturalistic influences and personal experiences would seem to fill out the picture completely. But they leave out a great deal of knowledge and

-259-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In Search of America: Transatlantic Essays, 1951-1990
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.