In Search of America: Transatlantic Essays, 1951-1990

By Marcus Cunliffe | Go to book overview

OLD WORLD, NEW WORLD

The pieces in this section generalize more broadly than the essays in other parts of the book. "America" figures as a large homogenous unit and as an idea held by inhabitants of the United States and by people in Europe and other countries. These final essays -- final in the sense of coming at the end of the volume, though written over a quarter of a century -- also betray a persistent interest in comparative themes. In one of Don DeLillo's richly speculative novels, The Names ( 1982), a character who happens to be an American archaeologist throws off a remark he does not attempt to explain, to the effect that he has sometimes thought of Europe as a hardcover publication, America as the paperback version. For me similar queries have kept presenting themselves. I have been puzzled to decide how far the United States grows out of a European heritage, how it differs, how and when such difference began, and to what extent the influence has spread outward from the United States as well as inward from elsewhere.

Thus, of the five essays in this Part IV, three examine European ideas about America and to a lesser extent what the United States has made of Europe. The theme of anti-Americanism, directly discussed in the final essay, treats the phenomenon more lightly than some of its predecessors. That reflects a growing belief on my part that anti-Americanism should not be treated by Americans merely or even mainly as the product of misinformation and spleen. I suggest that it may reflect the irritation of foreigners in the face of American xenophobia; also that anti-Americanism, so called, is a conspicuous feature of many comments by Americans themselves. Their anger and disappointment at what they sense as a loss of national integrity is to some degree a privileged, internal quarrel -- sometimes verging on hysteria, sometimes justified, but nearly always ultimately a credit to a society in which criticism can not only be accepted but in some circumstances actually demanded. If certain outsiders seek to bolster their own

-305-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In Search of America: Transatlantic Essays, 1951-1990
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.