America's Struggle with Chemical-Biological Warfare

By Albert J. Mauroni | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 13
Individual Protection--
Part 2

In 1985 the Air Force announced it was procuring and fielding the former XM30 mask as the MCU-2/P protective mask, with a softer one-lens facepiece and a harder, clip-on protective shield. All Air Force ground personnel would use this mask. It was also adopted by NAVSEA, NAVAIR, and Marine Corps aviation crews, given its superior field of vision and better fit (as compared to the M17A2 mask) and its immediate availability (as compared to the M40 mask). Marine Corps ground forces and NAVFAC continued to procure the Army's M17-series masks for their ground personnel. Other government agencies, specifically law enforcement and the Secret Service, began requesting the new MCU-2/P masks as well, admiring the larger field of vision, more comfortable fit, and external canister. The Air Force's success with the MCU-2/P raised eyebrows at the Army's continuing difficulties with the M40 mask program.

M40 mask production had continued to hit delays due to difficulties designing the masks for industrial production and related testing issues. While it is one thing to produce a few hundred masks with trained industry personnel, it is something entirely different to produce tens of thousands of protective masks that would all pass quality assurance testing. The rubber facepiece molds for masks and the industrial presses, in particular, are critical to the process and are very difficult to design. Complicating the issue was a change in contractors, due to the military's requirement to open-bid each stage of R&D and production, and the practice of awarding contracts to low-bidding firms over higher quality (and more expensive) firms.

Although ILC Dover had conducted a large portion of the R&D on the mask, the production contract was awarded to Scott Aviation after the mask's type classification in May 1987. Scott Aviation delivered only 3,358 masks out of a contract target of 300,000, which initially resulted in a stop-work order in 1988, and eventually the contract's termination for the convenience of the government in January 1990. In September 1988 AMCCOM awarded Mine Safety Appliances (MSA) and ILC Dover with short-term M40 production contracts (120,000 each

-163-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
America's Struggle with Chemical-Biological Warfare
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 293

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.