Renewing America's Progress: A Positive Solution to School Reform

By Fredric H. Genck | Go to book overview

17
Test Data Analysis: How to Measure and Improve Student Learning

Perhaps the most fundamental principle of organizational effectiveness is the need to clearly establish purpose and measure results. In schools the focus of purpose is on student learning. Fortunately an excellent measure (at least at lower grade levels) is available -- standardized achievement test scores. While it is by no means perfect, careful analysis of growth rates and percentiles of achievement compared with ability over a period of at least five to ten years provides a valuable, indeed essential, measure of performance. School boards need to be sure that their administrators are reporting test scores to them in easily understandable formats. Outsiders can also interpret these data -- concerned parents or taxpayers, for example. Teachers and administrators should welcome such measures, even though there are some risks, because they are a way of demonstrating good performance, improving results, and justifying funding and salaries.

Test scores are only one indicator of performance, and no one measure of schools is adequate by itself. I have placed this chapter after those on parent and teacher surveys because test scores are less accurate and less complete as a measure. They change from year to year in ways that are sometimes inexplicable. Nevertheless, by measuring results, performance is improved and individual creativity and differences of style and method are encouraged, as long as they produce good results. Test scores are a much more gentle measure then some of the extremely complicated and time-consuming objective-setting techniques imposed by some states on their schools. And be careful not to overmeasure, providing an incentive to fiddle with results. A

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Renewing America's Progress: A Positive Solution to School Reform
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.