Why the Cold War Ended: A Range of Interpretations

By Ralph Summy; Michael E. Salla | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
"Europe 1989: The Role of Peace Research and the Peace Movement," Chapter 6 of this volume, p. 95.
2.
For a discussion of Kuhn's distinction between the cold war and the Cold War, see "Whose Cold War?" Chapter 10 of this volume, pp. 153-69.
3.
"In the Shadow of the Middle Kingdom Syndrome: China in the Post-Cold War World," Chapter 14 of this volume, p. 219.
4.
"Did Reagan 'Win' the Cold War?" Chapter 1 of this volume, p. 20.
5.
Galtung, "Europe 1989," p. 95.
6.
"The End of the Cold War: The Brezhnev Doctrine," Chapter 3 of this volume, p. 59.
7.
See Galtung, "Europe 1989," p. 92; Ulf Sundhaussen, "The Erosion of Regime Legitimacy in Eastern European Satellite States: The Case of the German Democratic Republic," Chapter 7 of this volume, pp. 117-18.
8.
For a discussion of political realism and its principal exponents, see James Dougherty and Robert L. Pfaltzgraff Jr., Contending Theories of International Relations: A Comprehensive Survey, 2nd ed. ( New York: Harper & Row, 1981), pp. 84-133.
9.
Hans Morgenthau, "Another 'Great Debate': The National Interest of the US," American Political Science Review 46, no. 4 ( 1952): 978.
10.
Zbigniew Brzezinski, "The Cold War and Its Aftermath," Foreign Affairs 71, no. 4 ( 1992): 42.
11.
"Carrots Were More Important Than Sticks in Ending the Cold War," Chapter 11 of this volume, p. 180.
12.
"How the Cold War Became an Expensive Irrelevance," Chapter 12 of this volume, pp. 200-201.
13.
Clements, "Carrots Were More Important Than Sticks," p. 178.
14.
Suter, "How the Cold War Became an Expensive Irrelevance," p. 194.
15.
Ibid., pp. 187, 202.
16.
Paul M. Kennedy, The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers: Economic Change and Military Conflict from 1500 to 2000 ( London: Unwin Hyman, 1988), p. xxv.
17.
"Upper Volta with Rockets: Internal Versus External Factors in the Decline of the Soviet Union," Chapter 8 of this volume, p. 126.
18.
"Marxism, Capitalism, and Democracy: Some Post-Soviet Dilemmas," Chapter 9 of this volume, p. 142.
19.
Kuhn, "Whose Cold War?" p. 162.
20.
Clements, "Carrots Were More Important Than Sticks," p. 177.
21.
Joseph A. Camilleri, "The Cold War . . . and After: A New Period of Upheaval in World Politics," Chapter 15 of this volume, p. 239.
22.
Francis Fukuyama, "The End of History?" The National Interest 16 (summer 1989): 4.
23.
Clements, "Carrots Were More Important Than Sticks," p. 175.
24.
Fukuyama, "The End of History?" p. 17.
25.
Leonard Dudley, The Word and the Sword: How Techniques of Information and Violence Have Shaped Our World ( Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1991), p. 320. Also quoted in Ralph Summy , "Book Review," Australian Journal of Politics and History 39, no. 1 ( 1993): 136.
26.
Dudley, The Word and the Sword, p. 9. Also quoted in Summy, "Book Review," p. 136.

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