Political Parties of the Americas, 1980s to 1990s: Canada, Latin America, and the West Indies

By Charles D. Ameringer | Go to book overview

DOMINICA

Dominica is a heavily forested, very mountainous island state, just 29 miles by 16 miles (290 square miles) in size. Although approximately half of its 80,000 population is under the age of sixteen, its 1989 per capita gross domestic product of U.S.$1,848 is in the middle strata among the member nations of the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), trailing only Antigua, Saint Kitts-Nevis, and still-colonial Montserrat. Dominica, part of the Windward group of islands, is sandwiched between two French Overseas Departments, Martinique and Guadeloupe. Prior to the establishment of permanent British colonial control during the nineteenth century, Dominica experienced considerable French influence. The resultant French cultural "coloration" directly impacts eight of ten Dominicans today, according to Vera Green ( 1982), but includes the entire Dominican society if one considers such phenomena as dialect, legal practice, and tenant-landlord relations. Afro--West Indians dominate the Dominican population although the island also has scattered Europeans and Asians as well as one of the very few settlements of so-called black Caribs in the region.


Some Political History

As a sustained British colony for more than 150 years, Dominica experienced much the same colonization pattern established in other Commonwealth West Indian societies: elitist Crown governance in 1871; five elected council members after 1936; universal adult suffrage by 1951; home rule and Associate State status in 1967 (after two efforts to effect a federation had failed); and, finally, singular independence in 1978. All during this time, numerous efforts were made to confederate Dominica with other British colonies: in 1940, with the Leeward group of colonies; in 1956, with the Windward group. Compared with other Commonwealth Caribbean countries, Dominica was slow to develop political parties.

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Political Parties of the Americas, 1980s to 1990s: Canada, Latin America, and the West Indies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • About the Editor and Contributors xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Anguilla 7
  • Bibliography 9
  • Antigua and Barbuda 13
  • Bibliography 15
  • Argentina 21
  • Bibliography 26
  • Aruba 47
  • Bibliography 48
  • The Bahamas 53
  • Bibliography 55
  • Barbados 61
  • Bibliography 70
  • Belize 77
  • Bibliography 82
  • Bermuda 89
  • Bibliography 90
  • Bolivia 93
  • Bibliography 95
  • Brazil 103
  • Conclusion 121
  • British Virgin Islands 131
  • Bibliography 132
  • Canada 133
  • Bibliography 153
  • Cayman Islands 167
  • Bibliography 168
  • Chile 169
  • Bibliography 172
  • Colombia 187
  • Bibliography 197
  • Costarica 207
  • Bibliography 212
  • Cuba 223
  • Bibliography 226
  • Dominica 235
  • Bibliography 237
  • Dominican Republic 243
  • Bibliography 248
  • Ecuador 267
  • Bibliography 270
  • El Salvador 281
  • Bibliography 286
  • Falkland Islands 303
  • Bibliography 304
  • French Guiana 305
  • Bibliography 306
  • Grenada 309
  • Bibliography 318
  • Guadeloupe 325
  • Bibliography 326
  • Guatemala 333
  • Bibliography 338
  • Guyana 349
  • Haiti 359
  • Honduras 373
  • Bibliography 377
  • Jamaica 383
  • Bibliography 387
  • Martinique 393
  • Bibliography 394
  • Mexico 401
  • Bibliography 411
  • Montserrat 435
  • Bibliography 436
  • Netherlands Antilles 437
  • Bibliography 439
  • Nicaragua 443
  • Bibliography 455
  • Panama 475
  • Bibliography 480
  • Paraguay 485
  • Bibliography 488
  • Peru 497
  • Bibliography 502
  • Puerto Rico 525
  • Bibliography 530
  • Saint Kitts-Nevis 537
  • Bibliography 540
  • Saint Lucia 545
  • Bibliography 547
  • Saint Pierre and Miquelon 551
  • Bibliography 552
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 555
  • Bibliography 559
  • Suriname 565
  • Bibliography 568
  • Trinidad and Tobago 573
  • Bibliography 577
  • Turks and Caicos Islands 587
  • Bibliography 588
  • Uruguay 591
  • Bibliography 598
  • Venezuela 605
  • Bibliography 611
  • Virgin Islands of the United States 627
  • Bibliography 630
  • Appendix 633
  • Index 651
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