Serving the Underserved: Caring for People Who Are Both Old and Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Caregivers

By Mary C. Howell; Deirdre G. Gavin et al. | Go to book overview

24
CONFIDENTIALITY

Eric Harris

It is said that the notion of a "right" to privacy is a peculiarly American convention. In our society, information is important. It information gets into the wrong hands it can be damaging. We all value our privacy.

As is the case with so many of the interests of people with mental retardation, their rights to privacy and confidentiality may not be carefully protected. In part this is because they are often looked upon as perpetual children, surely an inappropriate designation for people who are chronologically adult. It is also true that we tend to think of people with mental retardation as "incompetent," a designation that can in fact be made only by a judge; all adults are competent until a judge rules otherwise. (See Chapter 23)

Beyond this legal convention, however, lies a confusion about what rights are owed to all citizens, competent or incompetent. This is not only a question of laws but also a question of values and ethics; we must each decide whether we think that privacy and confidentiality are due to every citizen, even a citizen who may in some respects not be competent. Finally, the privacy and confidentiality rights of a person with mental retardation might be ignored because that person needs to be cared for by others, and those who give care may feel they have a right (as a return for caretaking) to talk about the person in their care in a way that violates her privacy.

In the mental health field, the nature of client information is exceptionally sensitive. In fact, the therapeutic endeavor cannot take place unless people are encouraged to reveal the most sensitive and important information about themselves. If a client does not feel safe to talk about what is bothering her (and this is often confidential information), then it is most difficult to have effective therapy.

Confidentiality is an important issue for mental health professionals. Discussions of legal issues in mental health care always consider

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Serving the Underserved: Caring for People Who Are Both Old and Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Caregivers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 508

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.