Serving the Underserved: Caring for People Who Are Both Old and Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Caregivers

By Mary C. Howell; Deirdre G. Gavin et al. | Go to book overview

50
BURNOUT AMONG FAMILY CAREGIVERS

Edith Finaly-Neumann

The concept of burnout emerged in the early 1970s. Its heritage is embedded in the ideas of Herbert Freudenberg, Christina Maslach, and Ayala Pines. Since then, the term "burned out" has been used to describe a condition of staff and administrators in positions that have a high degree of people contact. 1 I would like to extend this concept of burnout to family caregivers as well.

Burnout may be a widespread consequence of caregiving. A definition of burnout as a response to chronic emotional stress contains three components: emotional and/or physical exhaustion, lowered job productivity, and depersonalization. There is a general consensus that the symptoms of burnout include attitudinal, emotional, and physical components. 2

Staff who work with people who are mentally retarded and old often need to make decisions on behalf of their clients. (See Chapter 23) One important type of recommendation made by our Interdisciplinary Team had to do with placement out of an institutional residential setting. Sometimes this recommendation resulted in the person with mental retardation being placed either in a foster home or in the care of a family member. Financial assistance, services, and emotional support are needed to provide an alternative to institutional care of people who are old. This sort of residential placement also links the older person with mental retardation to the formal community resources that he needs.

The results of a decision to have a family care for a person with mental retardation who is old are not without possible adverse consequences to the parties involved. One of the major consequences of this care is the family burnout response. The process of burnout is more often the result not of stress per se, but of unmediated stress: being stressed and having no "out," no buffer, and no support system. 3

-277-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Serving the Underserved: Caring for People Who Are Both Old and Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Caregivers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 508

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.