Serving the Underserved: Caring for People Who Are Both Old and Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Caregivers

By Mary C. Howell; Deirdre G. Gavin et al. | Go to book overview

53
INSTITUTIONAL ETHICS COMMITTEES

Mary C. Howell

Wherever ethical dilemmas of caretaking arise, an Institutional Ethics Committee can help clarify ethical principles and issues and inform the decisions that must be made. Although Institutional Ethics Committees are ordinarily committees of hospitals, any residential institution where people who are dependent are cared for, and where numbers and disciplinary orientations of staff members (or consultant members) are broad enough to provide depth and variety of perspective, could consider the establishment of such a standing committee.

The notion of the Institutional Ethics Committee, or IEC, first came to prominence as a consequence of three landmark events in the late 1970s and early 1980s. In 1976, in the case of Karen Ann Quinlan (whose parents wished that she be disconnected from a mechanical respirator, as she was diagnosed as being in an "irreversible coma"), the Supreme Court of New Jersey recommended that a family should be able to consult an "ethics committee" in order to make this sort of decision. 1 In 1983, the President's Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biomedical and Behavioral Research, in the document "Deciding to Forego Life-Sustaining Treatment," recommended that appropriate procedures be used for decision-making, that ethics committees might improve decision-making, and that the courts should be involved only as a last resort. 2 Also in 1983, the federal Department of Health and Human Services promulgated the so-called Baby Doe regulations, which encourage but do not mandate that hospitals caring for newborns establish infant care review committees, analogues of what we call IECs. 3

The functions of the generic IEC are to develop policies and guidelines for limitations of treatment; to monitor problematic cases by record review; to review specific cases in progress; to enhance patient (and family) competence by education; to provide for designation of

-296-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Serving the Underserved: Caring for People Who Are Both Old and Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Caregivers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 508

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.