Banking across State Lines: Public and Private Consequences

By Peter S. Rose | Go to book overview

acter and possibilities of the information age, banking must become more efficient, more service responsive, and more focused on the central roles so that it can profitably perform in tomorrow's economy. Banking as most people know it need not die, but it must certainly change in order to survive, as must the people who manage and direct its talent and resources. Interstate expansion may help to insure the banking industry's long-run survival and arrest its recent loss of market share to nonbank financial firms provided that interstate companies, through their service policies and production efficiencies, are better able to deliver those services most in public demand at lowest cost. Whether such a favorable outcome will occur as interstate banking spreads across the United States and comes to dominate the assets and deposits held by all American banks is an open question very much in need of future research.


NOTES
1.
Of course, what these forecasters may have forgotten is the opportunities recent industry consolidation may have created for new banks. Between 1980 and 1995 about thirty-two hundred new banks were launched, roughly half the number absorbed by merger over the same period (as illustrated in table 1.3). Far from disappearing, community banks have been successful in focusing upon unique nichespersonalized service for families, small businesses, and professionals--and these special customer niches may be difficult and costly for larger, more distant banks to duplicate qualitatively.
2.
For example, one relatively small bank holding company in the author's home town sold out to a leading midwestern holding company simply because it couldn't keep abreast of growing check processing burdens and new industry and government standards for payments services.

-21-

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