Artificial Intelligence and Literary Creativity: Inside the Mind of BRUTUS, a Storytelling Machine

By Selmer Bringsjord; David A. Ferrucci | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
Setting the Stage 1.1 The Turing Test Sequence

Lady Lovelace famously pressed against Alan Turing and his "Turing Test"1 (hereafter T1) a short but powerful argument; charitably paraphrased, it runs as follows.

Computers can't create anything. For creation requires, minimally, originating something. But computers originate nothing; they merely do that which we order them, via programs, to do. (see [236])

Let's agree to momentarily postpone the issue of whether this reasoning is sound -- in favor of the observation that Lovelace apparently believed T1would in the future be passed by a computing machine, even if the judge running the test asked questions designed to be

____________________
1
The test was discussed in the Preface, and is part of the canon of AI and cognitive science. Turing's scheme was simple, but seminal. A human judge is able to communicate (only) by -- to modernize a bit -- e-mail with two players, each concealed in a separate room. One player is a woman, the other a computer. Turing said that when we reach the point at which human judges do no better than 50/50 when rendering verdicts as to which player is in fact a woman, we will have machines that can truly think. He believed this point would arrive before the turn of the century. Bringsjord believes that his [32] refutes Turing's position. Our next, more robust implementation of the BRUTUS architecture, BRUTUS2, will reflect our doing for mendacity what we have done for betrayal; that is, BRUTUS2 will be armed with an account of mendacity like the account of betrayal described in Chapter 4. Mendacity would seem to be at the heart of the Turing Test.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Artificial Intelligence and Literary Creativity: Inside the Mind of BRUTUS, a Storytelling Machine
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xv
  • List of Tables xxix
  • List of Figures xxxi
  • Chapter 1 Setting the Stage 1.1 the Turing Test Sequence 1
  • Chapter 2 Could a Machine Author Use Imagery? 33
  • Chapter 3 Consciousness and Creativity 67
  • Chapter 4 Mathematizing Betrayal 81
  • Chapter 5 the Narrative-Based Refutation of Church's Thesis 105
  • Chapter 6 Inside the Mind of Brutus 149
  • Bibliography 205
  • Index 226
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.