Artificial Intelligence and Literary Creativity: Inside the Mind of BRUTUS, a Storytelling Machine

By Selmer Bringsjord; David A. Ferrucci | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
Inside the Mind of BRUTUS

Good gentlemen, look fresh and merrily, Let not our looks put on our purposes; But bear it as our Roman actors do, With untired spirits and formal constancy.

--Brutus, in Julius Caesar


6.1 Where Are We In History?

Though the diagnosis is brutally simplistic, we see three stages in the history of story generation, namely, (i) Meehan's TALE-SPIN and the systems that spring from a reaction to it, (ii) Turner's MINSTREL, and -- no surprise here -- (iii) a stage starting with the advent of BRUTUS. We believe that stage (ii), which encapsulates the view that even cases of awe-inspiring creativity axe at bottom based on standard, computable problem-solving techniques (and as such marks the natural maturation of stage (i)), will stubbornly persist for some time alongside (iii). As you will recall, we cheerfully operate under the belief that human (literary) creativity is beyond computation -- and yet strive to craft the appearance of creativity from suitably configured computation. Stage (ii) is fatally flawed by the assumption that human creativity can in fact be reduced to computation. When the years tick on and on without this reduction materializing, more and more thinkers will come round to the approach BRUTUS is designed to usher in: that which shuns the search for such reduction in favor of clever engineering. Hollywood will

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Artificial Intelligence and Literary Creativity: Inside the Mind of BRUTUS, a Storytelling Machine
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xv
  • List of Tables xxix
  • List of Figures xxxi
  • Chapter 1 Setting the Stage 1.1 the Turing Test Sequence 1
  • Chapter 2 Could a Machine Author Use Imagery? 33
  • Chapter 3 Consciousness and Creativity 67
  • Chapter 4 Mathematizing Betrayal 81
  • Chapter 5 the Narrative-Based Refutation of Church's Thesis 105
  • Chapter 6 Inside the Mind of Brutus 149
  • Bibliography 205
  • Index 226
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