Eugene O'Neill and Oriental Thought: A Divided Vision

By James A. Robinson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Numerous individuals and institutions have assisted me in the research and writing of this book. First, I am grateful for the generous support of various fellow O'Neill scholars. Kathy Lynn Bernard provided me with a free copy of her excellent dissertation on O'Neill's library, and gave me information on O'Neill's research. Louis Sheaffer and Barbara Gelb responded promptly and helpfully to my inquiries, as did Frederic Wilkens of Suffolk University. Travis Bogard shared his opinion of the manuscript with me, and suggested ways in which details of my argument might be strengthened. His colleague at the University of California at Berkeley, Frederic I. Carpenter, requires special thanks here. His published ideas about O'Neill and Orientalism inspired my thesis; his advice and encouragement sustained me in the early stages of my work; and his perceptive criticisms of my first draft assisted me in my revisions. Indeed, this study might not have been conceived, written and published without the help he has given to a fellow scholar whom he has never met.

Another O'Neill scholar closer to home has also been invaluable to me. Jackson Bryer, my friend and colleague at the University of Maryland at College Park, helped guide me to my thesis, advised me countless times during the process of composition, and assisted me in the search for a publisher. My thanks to him, and to other Maryland professors: George Panichas and Carl Bode, whose constructive criticism aided me in my revisions of chapters one and three respectively; Robert Coogan, whose knowledge of Roman Catholicism (and association with Catholic clergy) contributed to my third chapter; Joseph Mancini, whose enthusiastic interest helped me develop and synthesize my ideas; and Theresa Coletti, whose moral and practical support I deeply appreciate. My gratitude also goes to the excellent secretarial staff in the English office, nearly all of whom participated in typing final copy. Finally, I am

-ix-

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Eugene O'Neill and Oriental Thought: A Divided Vision
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Epigraph xi
  • 1 - A Divided VIsion 1
  • 2 - Journeys East 10
  • 3 - Northwest Passages 32
  • 4 - A Western Passage to the East 85
  • 5 - Oriental Thoughts for A Religious Theatre 120
  • 6 - Journeys Home 168
  • Bibliography 189
  • Index 197
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