Eugene O'Neill and Oriental Thought: A Divided Vision

By James A. Robinson | Go to book overview

5
Oriental Thoughts for a Religious Theatre

During the period in which The Fountain and "Marco Millions" were composed, other O'Neill plays (like The Emperor Jones and The Hairy Ape) employed expressionistic effects which dramatized man's isolation in a hostile universe. In 1924, O'Neill paid tribute to the figure who inspired this departure from realistic conventions. "All that is enduring in what we loosely call 'Expressionism,''' he asserted, "can be clearly traced back through Wedekind to Strindberg The Dream Play, There Are Crimes and Crimes, The Spook Sonata, etc." O'Neill's innovations had the same purpose he ascribed to his Swedish master: to "express in the theatre what we comprehend intuitively of that self-defeating, selfobsession which is the discount we moderns have to pay for the loan of life." That exploration of psychological questions was rooted in a religious impulse that also resembled that of Strindberg. Each writer hoped to discover (in O'Neill's words) "some as yet unrealized region where our souls, maddened by loneliness and the ignoble inarticulateness of the flesh, are slowly evolving their new language of kinship."1 Yearning for communion and a release from alienation, both playwrights also turned East at the time they ventured into expressionism. Strindberg, in fact, had studied Buddhism and Hinduism fifteen years before he returned to them while composing A Dream Play in 1901. For O'Neill, however, his initial ex-

____________________
1
Playbill for The Spook Sonata, ept. in Cargill, Fagin, and Fisher, Criticism, pp. 108-9.

-120-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Eugene O'Neill and Oriental Thought: A Divided Vision
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Epigraph xi
  • 1 - A Divided VIsion 1
  • 2 - Journeys East 10
  • 3 - Northwest Passages 32
  • 4 - A Western Passage to the East 85
  • 5 - Oriental Thoughts for A Religious Theatre 120
  • 6 - Journeys Home 168
  • Bibliography 189
  • Index 197
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 201

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.