Children of the Dark House: Text and Context in Faulkner

By Noel Polk | Go to book overview

Introduction: Pleasure of the Texts

I don't know anything about inspiration because I don't know what inspiration is -- I've heard about it, but I never saw it.

LG 248

I received a copy of the printed book and I found that I didn't even want to see what kind of jacket Smithhad put on it. I seemed to have a vision of it and the other ones subsequent to The Sound and the Fury ranked in order upon a shelf while I looked at the titled backs of them with a flagging attention which was almost distaste, and upon which each succeeding title registered less and less, until at last Attention itself seemed to say, Thank God I shall never need to open any one of them again.

Introduction 708

The essays in this collection derive from an abiding interest in the intense reciprocities between William Faulkner's life and his work, between his lived and his imaginative lives. Most of them explore his engagement with his psychic life, the last two his more public social and political selves. The first concerns the specific site of that reciprocity, the manuscript and typescript pages on to which he translated, transmuted, one life into the other -- through what conscious or unconscious processes of refraction, repression, or sheer exploitation we are only now beginning to understand.

The first essay thus signals where, for me, things begin in literary criticism, the encounter with the text at the level of its most basic components: the words the author put on the paper, the conditions under which they got there, the mechanical means by which they were altered or left alone in the typing, editing, and printing processes. A

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Children of the Dark House: Text and Context in Faulkner
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction: Pleasure of the Texts vii
  • Where the Comma Goes - Editing William Faulkner 3
  • Children of the Dark House 22
  • Trying Not to Say - A Primer on the Language Of The Sound and the Fury 99
  • The Artist as Cuckold 137
  • Ratliff's Buggies 166
  • Woman and the Feminine In a Fable 196
  • Man in the Middle - Faulkner and the Southern White Moderate 219
  • Faulkner at Midcentury 242
  • Works Cited 273
  • Index 283
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.