Lunacy of Light: Emily Dickinson and the Experience of Metaphor

By Wendy Barker | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Ten years ago I discovered the body of Emily Dickinson's poetry to be radically different from the isolated poems of Emily Dickinson I had previously read, and energized by the burgeoning number of excellent feminist critical studies, I began to build this book.

Since that time many people have aided in the growth and completion of this manuscript. I am grateful to James Woodress for his kind, sustained encouragement and to Joanne Feit Deihl for her thoughtful, pertinent suggestions. I also wish to thank Nicolas J. Perella for his interest in the project at a crucial point in the early planning stages and Susan Gubar for her clear insights and wise advice. Others have provided helpful references and suggestions: among them, Elyse Blankley, Alan E. Craven, Nancy Gutierrez, Andrea Hammer, Theresa M. Kelley, Arthur Orman, and Denise Rankin. In particular, I owe thanks to Barbara Clarke Mossberg, for offering not only warm encouragement but also incisive criticism in the last stages of revision. I am grateful, in addition, to the University of Texas at San Antonio for a Faculty Research Grant to help with manuscript preparation. And to Teresa White at Southern Illinois University Press I am especially grateful; she has been an ideal editor.

Others have helped in more intangible, and yet invaluable, ways: Mark Allen, Helen Aristar-Dry, Margaret Bedrosian, Judy Fisher, Elliot Gilbert, and Martha Smith have offered the best sort of "Society" for the stoniest "Soul." Finally, the energy, expertise, wit, patience, and understanding that Sandra M. Gilbert has unstintingly provided can never be adequately acknowledged. Similarly, my debt to family members will be difficult to repay; I am keenly

-ix-

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Lunacy of Light: Emily Dickinson and the Experience of Metaphor
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Ad Feminam: Women and Literature vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - Gender, Hierarchy, and the Great Principle of Light 1
  • 1 - Broad Daylight, Cooking Stoves, and the Eye of God 31
  • 2 - Dowering and Depriving 51
  • 3 - Races Nurtured in the Dark 74
  • 4 - Dwelling in Possibility 102
  • 5 - Enacting the Difference A Whole New Metaphor Beginning Here 134
  • Notes 189
  • Index to Dickinson Poems Cited 207
  • Index 211
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