Robert Coover: The Universal Fictionmaking Process

By Lois Gordon | Go to book overview

3
The Universal Baseball Association The Props of Meaning

Perfection wasn't a thing, a closed moment, a static fact, but
process, yes, and the process was transformation. (P. 212)

Henry Waugh, Coover's protagonist in the UBA ( 1968), faces the eternal human predicament: how to meet the need for power and control, omnipotence and immortality, in the face of one's own particular limitations, as well as the more awesome constraints imposed by time, aging, death, and the vagaries of fate. Coover draws upon a rich panoply of symbolic, historical, political, and social detail in order to characterize both Henry and his world. He manipulates the imagery and machinery of a score of artistic, religious, and social myths which, through the ages, have attempted to deal with the human dilemma. In both form and subject, he illustrates the limitations of the many "answers" construed by man to comfort him in his own temporality. Though one is driven to create them, they can never fully satisfy one's deepest longings, because they can never halt or compensate for the alterations of time. One generation cometh, and another passeth away: such is the only truth, with the corollary truth that each generation retains the need for a sustaining mythology.

Coover subtly weaves through the text myriad, multifaceted allusions to popular and classical mythology. He then modulates, distorts, elaborates, or explodes each to prevent the coalescence of fixed meaning. Damon Rutherford, the novel's ace pitcher whose death transforms Henry's life, invokes the pagan world's reverence for the beautiful and perfect young athlete and its ritual celebration of his death in the Adonis surrogate. But Damon also points to later

-34-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Robert Coover: The Universal Fictionmaking Process
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 186

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.