The Idea of History

By R. G. Collingwood; J. Van Der Dussen | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
I. Quality [439]
History in what sense real? [439]
Ideality of history [440]
Past re-enacted in the present [441]
How is this possible? [444]
All history is history of thought [445]
How thought can be re-enacted [447]
Without becoming present [447]
Realistic theory rejected [448]
Copy-theory rejected [450]
II. Quantity [450]
Memoirs [451]
Universal history [452]
Monograph, theory of difficulties [452]
____________________
5
Following the table of contents under the heading 'Topics dealt with in Martouret Ms.', a list of 'Topics to be worked in' is added, which reads as follows:
1. History as understanding of process (but history not a mere series of events) leads on to:
2. History as understanding of the present (but not the whole present)-- leads on to:
3. Contingency of history.
4. Historical imagination (i.e. closer study of nature of historical inference).
5. Bradley's theory.
6. A priori element in history (i.e. the historian's point of view as starting point) (cf. history of history).
7. Bias, subjectivity, judgement of value (connected with 6).
8. Historical process and natural process.

Since in this list Bradley's theory is mentioned, it must have been added at a later date. For it is only in 1932 that Collingwood read Bradley's Presuppositions of Critical History, published in 1874, a copy being sent to him by the philosopher Joseph. In a letter to Joseph, dated 15 July 1932, Collingwood writes: 'It is very good of you to have lent me this rarity, which I have long wanted to see and have never seen before' ( Bodleian Library, MS Eng. lett., c 453, nr. 202). In ' The Historical Imagination' ( 1935) and ' Human Nature and Human History' ( 1936) some of the topics mentioned were indeed dealt with by Collingwood. That Collingwood has read the Martouret manuscript again in 1935 is made clear by the addition he made in that year (see p. 470). The list of 'topics to be worked in' therefore probably dates from the same time.

-437-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Idea of History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Editor's Introduction ix
  • Contents li
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I Greco-Roman Historiography 14
  • Part II the Influence of Christianity 46
  • Part III the Threshold of Scientific History 86
  • Part IV Scientific History 134
  • Part V Epilegomena 205
  • Preliminary Discussion the Idea of A Philosophy of Something, And, in Particular, A Philosophy of History (1927) 335
  • Lectures on the Philosophy of History (1926)1 359
  • Contents 360
  • Outlines of A Philosophy of History (1928) 426
  • Introductory Lecture 431
  • Contents 437
  • Iii. Relation 439
  • Index 497
  • More Oxford Paperbacks 511
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 522

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.