Sovereignty as Responsibility: Conflict Management in Africa

By Francis M. Deng; Sadikiel Kimaro et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

AS THE twentieth century nears its end, sovereignty is increasingly under attack. The nation-state paradigm has been frequently analyzed for its inadequacies in the post-World War II period, since neither the institution itself nor the myths by which it endures are fully appropriate to the current conditions. 1 But even as the traditional concept of sovereignty erodes, there is no presumptive, let alone adequate, replacement for the state. The locus of responsibility for promoting citizens' welfare and liberty, for organizing cooperation and managing conflict, when not exercised by society itself, remains with the state. Until a replacement is found, the notion of sovereignty must be put to work and reaffirmed to meet the challenges of the times in accordance with accepted standards of human dignity.

A cursory look at conditions on the African continent reveals several crisis areas and correlative policy themes: conflict management, human rights protection, democratic participation, and sustainable development. Although the priority is obviously debatable, there is a logic to the sequence. Because a situation of conflict, especially one involving mass violence and a breakdown of order, often implies gross violation of human rights, denial of democratic liberties, and frustration of socioeconomic development, conflict management claims a rightful place on top of the list. But it is perhaps more appropriate to emphasize the interconnectedness of these policy areas and their overlapping values.

Since October 1989, the Africa Project of the Brookings Institution's Foreign Policy Studies program has conducted research on these interrelated themes. Much of the research agenda has focused on conflict analysis, management, and resolution. This volume, the last in the series, draws major conclusions from the work already done and

-xi-

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Sovereignty as Responsibility: Conflict Management in Africa
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Publications of the Brookings Institution's Conflict Resolution in Africa Project ii
  • Title Page iii
  • The Brookings Institution v
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Normative Framework of Sovereignty 1
  • 2 - Governance 34
  • 3 - Identity 61
  • 4 - Economics 93
  • 5 - Regional Dynamics 131
  • 6 - International Actors 168
  • 7 - Conclusion 211
  • Index 255
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