The Hollow Army: How the U.S. Army Is Oversold and Undermanned

By William Darryl Henderson; Charles Moskos | Go to book overview

state that the individual replacement system is at fault. The causes are much deeper. They extend from fundamental system assumptions about career and personnel management as well as requirements for operational readiness. Perhaps most of all, the root cause is a failure of vision that has permitted personnel and training systems to evolve within which organizational structures and responsibilities are not well matched with functions. This fragmented, inefficient, structural-functional system has emerged on an ad hoc basis generally guided by a tendency to centralize functions at the Department of the Army level over the past fifteen years and has fallen short in its ability to produce first-rate combat units. It is also very likely that the limit of this system's ability to produce first-rate combat units has been reached significantly short of the standards necessary to win in war.

The needs is clear. The U.S. Army needs a personnel and training system that will allow unit commanders to achieve full operational readiness as well as build cohesive high-performing units. To achieve this a basic rule of systems theory must be recognized and accommodated. The rule simply stated is that a change made in one place in the system will eventually have an effect in many ways elsewhere in the system. In the present case such changes force the commander to suboptimize because the system prevents him from achieving operational readiness and building cohesive units at the same time. If the U.S. Army is ever to become a great army, it needs a system that allows commanders to achieve both.


NOTES
1.
Robert Holz, "ARI Briefing on NTC Focused Rotation, 86-13."
2.
Robert Holz, "ARI Briefing on NTC Focused Rotation, 88-5."
3.
Kent Eaton and G. Neff, "ARI Tech Report 350,"28-29. The absence of positive data in targets hit is probably related to the inadequacy of using tank table VIII as a measure of performance. Table XII would possibly be a better test of crew ability to hit the target under combat conditions.
4.
Mike McGee, "Forging Teamwork: Personnel Stabilization in Rifle Squads," Fort Leavenworth, Kans. Exec Net Paper 1-87.
5.
General E. C. Meyer, White Paper, 1980, 8. Cited in Thomas E. Kelly, "Towards Excellence: The Army Develops a New Personnel System,"14. Submitted to the Alfred P. Sloan School of Management, April 29, 1983, copy in author's possession.
6.
Lawrence R. Boice and T. O. Jacobs, "Toward True Measures of Personnel Turbulence" ( ARI Draft paper, Alexandria, Va., May 1988).
7.
D. H. Marlowe, et al., "Unit Manning System Evaluation." Technical Report No. 1 ( Washington, D.C.: Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, WRAIR,

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Hollow Army: How the U.S. Army Is Oversold and Undermanned
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Military Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Tables ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Ppreface xv
  • 1 - Introduction: Selling a Mythical Army 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - The Army Mission: A Mismatch for Today's Army 11
  • Notes 18
  • 3 - Army Manpower: An Issue with No Constituency 19
  • Notes 45
  • 4 - Training on a Treadmill 49
  • Notes 74
  • 5 - Personnel Turbulence 77
  • Notes 89
  • 6 - Small-Unit Leaders Should Be War Winners 91
  • Notes 104
  • 7 - Why Can't the American Army Create Cohesive Units? 107
  • Notes 125
  • 8 - The Broken Backbone 127
  • Notes 143
  • 9 - It's Broke and Needs to Be Fixed 145
  • Notes 154
  • Bibliography 155
  • Index 161
  • About the Author 165
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 168

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.