The Hollow Army: How the U.S. Army Is Oversold and Undermanned

By William Darryl Henderson; Charles Moskos | Go to book overview

7 WHY CAN'T THE AMERICAN ARMY CREATE COHESIVE UNITS?
Modern warfighting requires that the soldier be alone except for two or three fellow soldiers on his right, left, or in his vehicle or the next vehicle. Control of soldiers either in a modern European or Third World scenario presents major leadership problems for any army. The significance of the small unit to which the soldier belongs can hardly be overstated when considering leadership in war.The immense advantages in warfighting that accrue to an army that fields highly motivated soldiers fighting under superb small-unit leaders can be measured through the concept of cohesion. This chapter presents the broad requisites for cohesion and reviews the inability of the U.S. Army to produce cohesive units.
Core soldier values formed by their immediate leaders are primary determinants of the soldiers' day-to-day actions in high-performing units.
Cohesion measures reflect the degree of soldier bonding to each other and to unit leaders as well as soldier and unit commitment to core values and the goals for which they fight.
Measures of soldier core values and bonding to unit and leaders strongly indicate the U.S. Army has been unable to reach out to today's quality soldiers and bond them to their units and to the Army.
Indicators of cohesion, initially high after basic training, fall off sharply after assignment to the regular Army and continue to drop thereafter.
Soldier views of immediate unit leaders (E-5 through E-7) indicate a severe shortcoming in leaders' adherence to core professional values.

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The Hollow Army: How the U.S. Army Is Oversold and Undermanned
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Military Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Tables ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Ppreface xv
  • 1 - Introduction: Selling a Mythical Army 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - The Army Mission: A Mismatch for Today's Army 11
  • Notes 18
  • 3 - Army Manpower: An Issue with No Constituency 19
  • Notes 45
  • 4 - Training on a Treadmill 49
  • Notes 74
  • 5 - Personnel Turbulence 77
  • Notes 89
  • 6 - Small-Unit Leaders Should Be War Winners 91
  • Notes 104
  • 7 - Why Can't the American Army Create Cohesive Units? 107
  • Notes 125
  • 8 - The Broken Backbone 127
  • Notes 143
  • 9 - It's Broke and Needs to Be Fixed 145
  • Notes 154
  • Bibliography 155
  • Index 161
  • About the Author 165
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