The Hollow Army: How the U.S. Army Is Oversold and Undermanned

By William Darryl Henderson; Charles Moskos | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
It should be noted that many commanders in today's Army are very reluctant to acknowledge the possibility of such cohesion measurements, much less enthusiastically promote them, because they often indicate significant leadership lapses. As with any conservative organization, the Army is slow to move toward such measures even though they are valid assessments and point the way toward improvement in unit performance and warfighting capability.
2.
See for example: D. H. Marlow et al., "Unit Manning System Evaluation," Technical Reports Nos. 1 through 5 ( Washington, D.C.: Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) and the Army Research Institute (ARI) Values Survey briefing for the Army Committee for leadership and Values ( Alexandria, Va., May 20, 1986).
3.
All of these data are unclassified and have been made available to various elements of the Army's leadership.
4.
For example, examine the histories of French Army units in North Africa in the late 1950s and early 1960, and the history of North Vietnam and Vietcong units from 1965 to 1970.
5.
Charles C. Moskos and Frank R. Woods, eds., The Military -- More Than Just a Job? ( New York: Pergamon-Brassey's, 1988).
6.
Review figures in this chapter. The phenomenon of the erosion of core soldier values is sometimes explained away as an unavoidable and natural trend that occurs the longer the soldier is in the Army. However, experience in other armies (e.g., NVA, IDF, French) belies this "natural" trend explanation.
7.
Guy L. Siebold, "Army Values: Results of Theme Year Research," ( Alexandria, Va.: ARI, January 1987), 2.
8.
Robert Holz, Informal Briefing Chart ( Alexandria, Va.: ARI, January 1988).
9.
D. H. Marlow et al., "Unit Manning System Field Evaluation Technical Report No. 5." ( Washington, D.C.: Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, June 1987).
10.
Ibid., 1.
11.
It should be noted that even at their highest measures, the highest scores were only slightly above the scale midpoint and could indicate cohesion was only slightly above average at its best.
12.
Marlow et al., "Field Evaluation,"12-13.
13.
See definition of cohesion in William D. Henderson, Cohesion: The Human Element in Combat ( Washington, D.C.: National Defense University Press, 1985), 4.
14.
Marlow et al., "Field Evaluation,"14.
15.
Ibid., 15.
16.
Ibid., 1, 7.
17.
Siebold, "Army Values,"2.
18.
Marlow et al., "Field Evaluation,"2.
19.
K. R. Smith, "Dimensions of Morale" ( Armidale NSW, Australia: Armidale College, 1987), 2.
20.
While the COHORT program has failed to obtain its original objectives, its public relations efforts remain strong and even in early 1990 the public is generally unaware of its failure.

-125-

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The Hollow Army: How the U.S. Army Is Oversold and Undermanned
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Military Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Tables ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Ppreface xv
  • 1 - Introduction: Selling a Mythical Army 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - The Army Mission: A Mismatch for Today's Army 11
  • Notes 18
  • 3 - Army Manpower: An Issue with No Constituency 19
  • Notes 45
  • 4 - Training on a Treadmill 49
  • Notes 74
  • 5 - Personnel Turbulence 77
  • Notes 89
  • 6 - Small-Unit Leaders Should Be War Winners 91
  • Notes 104
  • 7 - Why Can't the American Army Create Cohesive Units? 107
  • Notes 125
  • 8 - The Broken Backbone 127
  • Notes 143
  • 9 - It's Broke and Needs to Be Fixed 145
  • Notes 154
  • Bibliography 155
  • Index 161
  • About the Author 165
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