The Hollow Army: How the U.S. Army Is Oversold and Undermanned

By William Darryl Henderson; Charles Moskos | Go to book overview

balance of payments, cohesion, permanent change of station costs, reduced management systems costs, and other data all prompt change. The Army needs to think forward to manning the force in the 1990s and the twenty-first century unfettered by the business-as-usual and evolutionary approach to change, which dictates that tomorrow will be much the same as today.


NOTES
1.
Peter W. Kuzumplik, summary of Comparative Wartime Replacement Systems ( Washington, D.C.: Defense Intelligence Agency, 1986).
2.
For an in-depth discussion of the goals and assumptions behind the rapid growth in the creation of the Army centralized management system for MPT, see Thomas E. Kelly, "Towards Excellence, The Army Develops a New Personnel System," manuscript submitted to Sloan School of Management, April 1983.
3.
Ibid., 76-77.
4.
A. J. Bacevich, "Old Myths, New Myths: Reviewing American Military Thought," Parameters, U.S. Army War College, March, 1988, 15.
5.
For an example of much of what is proposed here, see briefing by Kent Eaton and Paul Gade on Home Station Concept of Personnel Management, Army Research Institute, Manpower Laboratory, August 1988.

-154-

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The Hollow Army: How the U.S. Army Is Oversold and Undermanned
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Military Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Tables ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Ppreface xv
  • 1 - Introduction: Selling a Mythical Army 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - The Army Mission: A Mismatch for Today's Army 11
  • Notes 18
  • 3 - Army Manpower: An Issue with No Constituency 19
  • Notes 45
  • 4 - Training on a Treadmill 49
  • Notes 74
  • 5 - Personnel Turbulence 77
  • Notes 89
  • 6 - Small-Unit Leaders Should Be War Winners 91
  • Notes 104
  • 7 - Why Can't the American Army Create Cohesive Units? 107
  • Notes 125
  • 8 - The Broken Backbone 127
  • Notes 143
  • 9 - It's Broke and Needs to Be Fixed 145
  • Notes 154
  • Bibliography 155
  • Index 161
  • About the Author 165
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