The American Impact on Postwar Germany

By Reiner Pommerin | Go to book overview

6. DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL PATTERNS

Hermann Glaser

L et me first give a short numerical description of the terrible circumstances and conditions daily life was confronted with after the total war had ended in 1945:

In Europe, 19.6 million soldiers either died or were reported missing in action. Of these, 3.7 million were German. Civilians killed numbered 4.7 million; 3.6 million of them were Germans. Of these some 540,000 were victims of bombing, and about 7 million died during deportation. Approximately 6 million Jews of various nationalities were murdered; a total of 9 million human beings were killed in concentration camps. Approximately 9.6 million people who had been forced into Germany tried to return home, while 12 million fled from former German territories. From 6 to 7 million German soldiers were prisoners of war. Nearly 4 million German soldiers and civilians were wounded. In Germany 3 million were left homeless, 2.25 million homes were completely destroyed, 2.5 million were damaged, and the war left 400 million cubic meters of debris. The Rubble Years had begun.1

On the other side, the survivors were marked by a cultural euphoria. One of the survivors was Hartmut von Hentig, who received his Ph.D. in the United States and was influenced by John Dewey's educational philosophy. He is now an outstanding education expert and philosopher in the Federal Republic of Germany. In 1945 he was a young officer who had emigrated into the army at the advice of his father. Like so many of his generation, he experienced the "zero hour" (Stunde Null) as the most liberating event of his life:

Chaos and freedom, from that time on, will always be inseparable for me; in my mind they will remain associated with an overwhelmingly radiant summer in which I crossed the countryside on foot like a hundred thousand oth

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Impact on Postwar Germany
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 196

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.