They Called Them Angels: American Military Nurses of World War II

By Kathi Jackson | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 6B: CHINA DOLL

He lay at military attention. His rigid limbs, white color, glassy blue-eyed stare, and glistening, shaved head gained him the moniker of "China Doll."

Would he have goose-stepped mechanically about the tent if he'd been able to get up from his hospital cot? We thought so. To us he was the epitome of a Nazi, lending credence to all the propaganda we had heard.

Disdainfully, he turned his face to [the] canvas wall when the Protestant or Catholic chaplain made rounds. He was even more haughty with the thirty- nine other Germans in the ward. No doubt a chess player, he considered himself a knight while they were mere pawns.

These pawns were older men and pitifully young boys, replacements to Hitler's army after the Russians had skimmed the cream the winter before. They were glad to talk to any chaplain. They called us nurses "Schwester" which also means "sister" in German. China Doll did not deign to use this appellation.

"Sub-lieutenant," he rasped, noting that I had lowly gold bars on my work fatigues rather than silver ones. His glinty stare was fixed on the syringe in my hand. It was yet another penicillin injection, and he had gotten one every three hours day and night. Unfamiliar with this newly developed antibiotic, he suspected torture.

"I demand my rights under the Geneva Treaty. I am senior officer here," he continued, trying to pull himself to full stature under the bed sheets.

I corrected him in my most Nightingale voice. "In medical matters, nurses outrank all patients. This is the same treatment given to wounded Americans." (No need to struggle with school-book German here; his English was better than mine.)

He bore the shot stoically, of course, and winced only later when, on turning back, his pillow shifted and out rolled a piece of bread squirreled away from his lunch tray. Embarrassment was fleeting; back came the impassive, expressionless mask.

When he needed blood, our ward officer arrived to administer it himself. China Doll's eyes took in the doctor's insignia, not his face, then shifted warily to the flask of dark liquid I was hanging on an I.V. pole overhead.

"From whom was this blood obtained?" He demanded, addressing the superior officer.

The doctor worked on methodically, taking his time. Then he gave his rather loud, off-hand reply to a nearby German.

"Tell him this was a fine young Jewish boy's blood."

"Juden blut, juden blut," chorused back through the tent, accompanied by ripples of suppressed laughter. The other patients knew we took blood for them from Germans in the stockade. They hadn't shared this, or much else, with China Doll.

-86-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
They Called Them Angels: American Military Nurses of World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Note xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Notes xx
  • Chapter 1 Uncle Sam Wants You! 1
  • Notes 6
  • Chapter 2 from Whites to Fatigues 7
  • Notes 15
  • Chapter 3 Following the Troops 17
  • Notes 21
  • Chapter 4 the Pacific Theater 23
  • Notes 47
  • Chapter 5 the Mediterranean Theater 51
  • Notes 62
  • Chapter 6 the European Theater 65
  • Notes 82
  • Appendix 6a: Rain on A Tent in Normandy 85
  • Appendix 6b: China Doll 86
  • Appendix 6c: the Gardelegen Barn 88
  • Appendix 6d: Second Lieutenant Frances Y. Slanger 92
  • Chapter 7 the China-Burma-India Theater 93
  • Notes 97
  • Chapter 8 the United States and Western Atlantic Minor Theaters 99
  • Notes 106
  • Appendix 8a: Nursing in A Stateside Burn Ward 107
  • Chapter 9 Wild Blue Yonder 109
  • Notes 117
  • Appendix 9a: Tales of An Air Force Nurse 119
  • Chapter 10 Life at Sea 121
  • Notes 135
  • Chapter 11 Camaraderie and Romance 139
  • Notes 152
  • Chapter 12 Leaving a Legacy 155
  • Notes 169
  • Appendices 171
  • Notes 182
  • Bibliography 183
  • Index 207
  • About the Author 213
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 220

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.