Telling the Truth to Your Adopted or Foster Child: Making Sense of the Past

By Betsy Keefer; Jayne E. Schooler et al. | Go to book overview

QUESTIONS
1. For the small group activity and discussion for this chapter, spend the time asking each participant to practice writing their own child's story.
2. If some participants do not have a personal example, they can use the following example with which to practice.

Katie is now eight years old and has been in her adoptive home for six and one- half years. A lifebook was never prepared for her and her adoptive parents have returned to the agency for more information about Katie's past. They knew that her mother was dead and her father in jail because of the murder, but they did not have a lot of details. What they learned that day, they felt was important to pass on to her.

Katie came into foster care at fourteen months. She had witnessed the brutal stabbing of her birth mother by her birth father. After the stabbing, her father grabbed her and hid from police for two days. When she was eventually found at a friend's home, she was still wearing the bloodstained pajamas she had on the night of the horrific event. Her foster family eventually adopted her at two years of age. How would you write her story?


NOTES
1.
Greg Keck, "Affirming the Hurt Adoptee's Reality," Jewel among Jewell Adoption News, Spring 1999.
2.
Greg Keck, personal interview, May 12, 1999.
3.
Ibid.
4.
Dee Paddock, personal interview, May 29, 1999.
5.
Ibid.
6.
Jayne Schooler, Searching for a Past ( Colorado Springs: Pinon Press, 1995), 91.
7.
Greg Keck, personal interview, May 29, 1999.
8.
Dee Paddock, personal interview, May 29, 1999.
9.
Randolph Severson , To Bless Him Unaware: The Adopted Child Conceived by Rape ( Dallas: House of Tomorrow, 1992), 4.
10.
Vera Fahlberg. E-mail correspondence, July 15, 1999.
11.
Sue Pelleg, phone interview, July 21, 1999.
12.
Severson, 11-12.
13.
Ibid. For a more complete treatment of the subject, contact House of Tomorrow, 4209 McKinney Ave., Dallas, TX 75205.
14.
Adapted from Psalm 139, The Life Application Bible (Wheaton, Ill.: Tyndale House Publishers, 1991).

-113-

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