The Federalist Papers Reader and Historical Documents of Our American Heritage

By Frederick Quinn | Go to book overview

Editor's Preface

The origins of this study lie in the period of the Bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution, 1987-91. In a coincidence few could have anticipated, events and observances in honor of this historic document took place at a time of tremendous political upheaval in many parts of the world. Certain questions recurred in conversations with overseas jurists, constitution writers, teachers, and lawyers during that time: How do you govern a society? How do you create a constitution that works -- and lasts? One era of dictators and military rulers is passing; but governments with broadly based citizen participation can be fragile institutions, prone, when challenged, to collapse into anarchy, and vulnerable to authoritarian takeovers followed by widespread citizen disenchantment with political life.

In discussions abroad, in meetings with civic leaders from other nations, and in talks in American classrooms, a frequent question was, Why has the American Constitution lasted more than two hundred years? What conceptual and structural features account for its longevity? During the bicentennial period, more than two hundred speakers went abroad to discuss constitutional subjects; the Constitution was distributed in thousands of copies and numerous languages; and law and history books, scholarly conferences, and interactive television programs involving several countries all contributed to the international traffic in constitutional ideas.

The former Chief Justice of the United States, Warren E. Burger, actively participated in these initiatives, often meeting with judges, lawyers, and students, and sharing the bicentennial commission's "history and civics lesson for America" with local and international audiences. Although each country has its unique historical, political, and legal traditions, a preoccupation with fundamental questions of governance is universal, and answering the question, What animated the framers of the Constitution? is useful for both overseas audiences, some of whom struggle

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Federalist Papers Reader and Historical Documents of Our American Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.