The Federalist Papers Reader and Historical Documents of Our American Heritage

By Frederick Quinn | Go to book overview

The Gettysburg Address-Introduction

On November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln spoke at the Gettsysburg, Pennsylvania, cemetery. The small Pennsylvania town had been the site of a major Union-Confederate battle July 1-3, 1863 in which more than forty percent of the Confederate and thirty percent of the Union troops were killed or wounded. Lincoln was preceded by a famous orator, Edward Everett, who spoke for over two hours. Such long orations were common in an era before radio and television and, since there were no microphones, orators were often picked for their vivid speaking style and voices that could carry considerable distances. Lincoln spoke briefly and to the point. His abiding goal as President was to preserve the Union intact, for the possibility of the United States splitting into two countries was real. In his short speech Lincoln appealed to listeners to recall America's origins "four score and seven years ago" in 1776 as a country dedicated to individual freedom. The Civil War, he argued, was a test whether or not the free nation would endure. Lincoln's address at Gettysburg was far more than a political speech of the moment, it became one of the great funeral orations of the ages. Lincoln says of the war dead, "we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead who struggled here have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract." Next he calls on the living "rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced" and "to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us." The challenge, as Lincoln saw it, "that this nation under God shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth."

-247-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Federalist Papers Reader and Historical Documents of Our American Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.