CHAPTER XI
VARIETY (1910-12)

J. B. Yeats in New York; Passages from his Letters-- Death of George Pollexfen--Yeats' Government Pension; Trinity College and the Chair of Literature--The Player Queen--The Playboy in America and Revival of The Countess Cathleen--Social Life in England

What's riches to him
That has made a great peacock
With the pride of his eye?
The wind-beaten, stone-grey,
And desolate Three Rock
Would nourish his whim.
Live he or die
Amid wet rocks and heather,
His ghost will be gay
Adding feather to feather
For the pride of his eye.


I

J. B. YEATS was now in New York on a "visit" which had already lasted three years. Early in 1908, after having been presented with a cheque by Hugh Lane, Andrew Jameson and other Dublin friends who wished to show their appreciation of a wonderful personality and their sense of what art in Ireland owed to the old painter, he had chosen to cross the Atlantic with his daughter Lily, who was giving an exhibition of her Dun Emer

-259-

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W. B. Yeats, 1865-1939
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Prefatory Note v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Chapter I - Family and Early Associations 1
  • Chapter II - Schooldays 24
  • Chapter III - London (1887-91) 59
  • Chapter IV - Death of Parnel After An After 85
  • Chapter V - Mysticism in Prose and Verse 109
  • Chapter VII - Theatre and Politics: Maud Gonne 152
  • Chapter VIII - Out of Twilight 186
  • Chapter IX - The Abbey Theatre 215
  • Chapter X - Plays and Controversies 229
  • Chapter XI - Variety (1910-12) 259
  • Chapter XII - Responsibilities 280
  • Chapter XIII - Nineteen-Sixteen 295
  • Chapter XIV - Marriage 327
  • Chapter XV - Oxford 346
  • Chapter XVI - Meditations in Time of Civil War 366
  • Chapter XVII - A Sixty-Year-Old Smiling Public Man 391
  • Chapter XVIII - Wheels and Butterflies 427
  • Chapter XIX - Riversdale 462
  • Chapter XX - Old Age 475
  • Notes 515
  • Bibliography 519
  • Index 521
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