CHAPTER XIII
NINETEEN-SIXTEEN

A Lecture Tour in America--"Immortality and Survival"; A Ghost Story--Yeats' Essay on Swedenborg; Researches with Everard Feilding--Japanesc Drama--Yeats during the War; Refusal of Knighthood; Irish Anxieties--Study in Sussex; Thoughts on Wordsworth, Browning and Tennyson--Production of Hawk's Well; Yeats and the Queen; Responsibilities--Easter Week Rising--Thoughts of Marriage; A Conditional Proposal--Personal Crisis

And what if excess of love
Bewildered them till they died?
I write it out in a verse--
MacDonagh and MacBride
And Connolly and Pearse
Now and in time to be,
Wherever green is worn,
Are changed, changed utterly:
A terrible beauty is born.


1

THE voyage to America was villainous, and Yeats' ship was several days at sea before he had an opportunity of picking up acquaintances, as always he liked doing, among his fellow passengers. The first day that he went on deck someone recognised him and opened conversation by asking him what he thought of George Moore's article in the English Review. When others came out of

-295-

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W. B. Yeats, 1865-1939
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Prefatory Note v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Chapter I - Family and Early Associations 1
  • Chapter II - Schooldays 24
  • Chapter III - London (1887-91) 59
  • Chapter IV - Death of Parnel After An After 85
  • Chapter V - Mysticism in Prose and Verse 109
  • Chapter VII - Theatre and Politics: Maud Gonne 152
  • Chapter VIII - Out of Twilight 186
  • Chapter IX - The Abbey Theatre 215
  • Chapter X - Plays and Controversies 229
  • Chapter XI - Variety (1910-12) 259
  • Chapter XII - Responsibilities 280
  • Chapter XIII - Nineteen-Sixteen 295
  • Chapter XIV - Marriage 327
  • Chapter XV - Oxford 346
  • Chapter XVI - Meditations in Time of Civil War 366
  • Chapter XVII - A Sixty-Year-Old Smiling Public Man 391
  • Chapter XVIII - Wheels and Butterflies 427
  • Chapter XIX - Riversdale 462
  • Chapter XX - Old Age 475
  • Notes 515
  • Bibliography 519
  • Index 521
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