Emerson, the Wisest American

By Phillips Russell | Go to book overview

Chapter Twelve

I

ALMOST at once Emerson found diversion for his pallid thoughts in admiring the busy seamen and their practical skipper, their indifference to gales and their attention to the work in hand. He had an almost feminine admiration, a Nietzschean worship, for gross, hairy men who suggested the presence of that which he always regarded with shining eyes -- Power. They were plus men, and "all plus is good." They had muscle and stomach; "the first wealth is health"; and they swore and cursed in a rich and satisfying manner.

"Men of this surcharge of arterial blood cannot live on nuts, herb-tea, and elegies; cannot read novels and play whist; cannot satisfy all their wants at the Thursday Lecture or the Boston Athenaeum."

He admired them as he always secretly admired "strong transgressors like Jefferson or Jackson," the "bruisers," the "gross and peccant" men who, though "not clothed in satin," get the thing done, and whose excess of virility "brings its own antidote." In contemplating the versatile sailor, "tailor, carpenter, cooper, stevedore, and clerk, and astronomer besides," he forgot himself; pulpits and libraries sank below the horizon; and at length he was thanking "the sea and rough weather for a truckman's health and stomach."

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Emerson, the Wisest American
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Portraits *
  • Part One Doubting Youth 1
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 8
  • Chapter Three 15
  • Chapter Four 20
  • Chapter Five 31
  • Chapter Six 48
  • Chapter Seven 56
  • Chapter Eight 60
  • Chapter Nine 71
  • Chapter Ten 76
  • Chapter Eleven 82
  • Chapter Twelve 89
  • Chapter Thirteen 110
  • Chapter Fourteen 124
  • Chapter Fifteen 138
  • Part Two Manhood and Mastery 151
  • Chapter Sixteen 153
  • Chapter Seventeen 167
  • Chapter Eighteen 176
  • Chapter Nineteen 181
  • Chapter Twenty 193
  • Chapter Twenty One 205
  • Chapter Twenty-Two 223
  • Chapter Twenty-Three 235
  • Chapter Twenty-Four 249
  • Chapter Twenty-Five 263
  • Part Three Silver Years 269
  • Chapter Twenty-Six 271
  • Chapter Twenty-Seven 280
  • Chapter Twenty-Eight 293
  • Chapter Twenty-Nine 298
  • Afterword 315
  • Index 317
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 320

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.