The American People in Colonial New England

By James Axtell | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

The American People is founded on the belief that the study of history in the schools and junior levels of college generally begins at the wrong end. It usually begins with abstract and pre-digested conclusions--the conclusions of other historians as filtered through the pen of a textbook writer--and not with the primary sources of the past and unanswered questions--the starting place of the historian himself.

Since we all need, use, and think about the past in our daily lives, we are all historians. The question is whether we can be skillful, accurate, and useful historians. The only way to become such is to exercise our historical skills and interests until we gain competence. But we have to exercise them in the same ways the best historians do or we will be kidding ourselves that we are doing history when in fact we are only absorbing sponge-like the results of someone else's historical competence.

Historical competence must begin with one crucial skill--the ability to distinguish between past and present. Without a sharp sense of the past as a different time from our own, we will be unable to accord the people of the past the respect that we would like to receive from the people of the future. And without according them that respect, we will be unable to recognize their integrity as individuals or to understand them as human beings.

A good sense of the past depends primarily on a good sense of the present, on experience, and on the imaginative empathy to relate ourselves to human situations not our own. Although most students have had a relatively brief experience of life and have not yet given full expression to their imaginative sympathies, they do possess the one

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The American People in Colonial New England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • THE AMERICAN PEOPLE 1
  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • About the Editor 6
  • Acknowledgments 7
  • Foreword 9
  • Introduction 13
  • I. Birth 15
  • Ii. Growth 36
  • Iii. Love and Marriage 62
  • Iv. Work and Play 78
  • V. Right and Wrong 101
  • Vii. Death 153
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