After Appomattox: How the South Won the War

By Stetson Kennedy | Go to book overview

NEW CHAINS FOR OLD
CHAPTER 3

The havoc the war had wrought with the South physically was nothing compared to what it threatened to do to the South's institutions. The question confronting the postwar South was whether the old order, which had endured for centuries, was gone forever, or whether its essence could yet be salvaged by changing it somewhat.

Although the war had arrived at a military solution for the questions of secession and chattel slavery, the erstwhile Confederates were determined to preserve both white supremacy and black bondage throughout the region, albeit within the framework of the Union. Needless to say, they could not have the one without the other. Given the manifest resolve of the former slaves to take hold of, exercise, and defend their newfound freedom, it was obvious that strenuous measures would be required to deprive them of it. But the white supremacists were old hands at this, and they set about the task with evident zeal. Given also a perception by most Northerners that it was not for such a Southland that they had fought and won, continued conflict on an intensive scale was inevitable.

While reconstructionists had to start from scratch, white supremacists already had in place all the makings for an integrally racist society. The

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After Appomattox: How the South Won the War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • BOOKS BY STETSON KENNEDY ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • ADVISORY ix
  • Chapter 1. Our Big Lie 1
  • Chapter 2. The Cause Pauses 18
  • Chapter 3. New Chains for Old 31
  • Chapter 4. The Johnson Restoration 42
  • Chapter 5. Congressional Reconstruction 50
  • Chapter 6. The South Reoccupied 62
  • Chapter 7. Election Year 73
  • Chapter 8. The Hero of Appomattox Tries Again 94
  • Chapter 9. Testimonials 105
  • Chapter 10. The Second Secession 218
  • Chapter 11. Retreat and Panic 230
  • Chapter 12. The Shotgun Plan 237
  • Chapter 13. On the Centennial of the Republic 253
  • Chapter 14. The Treaty of Wormsley's Hotel 268
  • Aftermath 281
  • Alarum and Excursion 287
  • Notes 293
  • Bibliography 305
  • Index 311
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