Black Miami in the Twentieth Century

By Marvin Dunn | Go to book overview

2 BLACKS IN EARLY MIAMI (1896-1926)

The Great Freeze which struck the southeastern United States in the winter of 1894-1895 propelled ruined farmers and farm workers, white and black, to settle in warmer south Florida. Ultimately, this led to the arrival of the Florida East Coast Railroad at Biscayne Bay in 1896 and the founding of the City of Miami in that year.

The black section of the new city was called Colored Town, and although other black communities developed in Coconut Grove and south Dade, it was Colored Town that became the focus of black life in Dade County. An informal color line restricted Miami blacks to living only in Colored Town, and as a result, a healthy and viable black business and professional community evolved to meet black needs. Blacks from the Bahamas continued to arrive in south Florida, and by the turn of the century a considerable percentage of the city's black population was from the islands. Their presence influenced many aspects of the cultural and religious life of the community.


The Railroad Comes to Biscayne Bay (1896)

Only the southern tip of Florida was spared by the Great Freeze. Sensing an opportunity to build the city she had envisioned, Julia Tuttle wrote to Henry Flagler. Tuttle promised to give half of her 640 acres to Flagler for the building of a city if he would bring his railroad to Biscayne Bay. William Brickell, who owned thousands of acres south of the Miami River, also agreed to donate half of his land to the new city.

A widely believed story holds that Tuttle convinced Flagler by sending him an orange blossom from her grove after the Great Freeze. However, it is contradicted somewhat by the memoirs of John Sewell, Flagler's lead man in building the city, who wrote, "Mr. Ingraham [ FEC vice-president for lands and development] was in the Miami section a few days after the great freeze in 1895 that killed practically all of the citrus trees in Florida, and killed coconut trees at Palm Beach, the thermometer going down into the twenties. Mr. Ingraham found orange blooms here on citrus trees that were at that time unhurt and

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Black Miami in the Twentieth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • PART 1 5
  • 2 - Blacks in Early Miami (1896-1926) 51
  • 3 - Blacks in Early Dade County (1896-1926) 101
  • PART 2 141
  • 5 - The Dade County Civil Rights Movement (1944-1970) 171
  • 6 - School Desegregation 224
  • PART 3 243
  • 8 - Riots of the 1980s 267
  • PART 4 315
  • 10 - Current Status of Blacks in Dade County: An Overview 334
  • Index 393
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 414

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.