Black Miami in the Twentieth Century

By Marvin Dunn | Go to book overview

5 THE DADE COUNTY CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT (1944-1970)

The civil rights period in Dade County predated the civil rights period in other parts of the South by at least a decade. It was led by the activists of the time, notably Father John E. Culmer of Saint Agnes Episcopal Church in Colored Town and later, Father Theodore R. Gibson of Christ Church in Coconut Grove. Legal matters for the movement were handled by a tenacious black lawyer named G. E. Graves Jr. Black demands for voting rights came first, and by the late 1940s the whites-only Democratic primary was struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court. Blacks in Dade County and elsewhere in the South found their political voice. In time, racial restrictions in public accommodations and housing were removed. Although some whites resisted the expansion of blacks into previously all-white neighborhoods, the desegregation of housing was a fact of life by the early 1970s.


The Movement Begins

Prior to the civil rights movement in Dade County, black people were truly second-class citizens. Relations between black and white people in Dade County were cordial, as long as black people understood that they were not the social equals of whites. The "whites only" signs, as prevalent in Miami as they were in other southern cities, stood everywhere as reminders in case someone forgot. Blacks could not use public parks or other facilities. They could not vote in the Democratic primary. Public schools were segregated. Black students could not attend the University of Miami or any of Florida's other state-supported colleges except Florida A & M University in Tallahassee. Blacks were excluded from living in certain neighborhoods. Certain jobs were not available to black people, and blacks were excluded from most labor unions.

Corine Dunn worked as a maid on Miami Beach in the 1930s and 1940s. "Black workers on Miami Beach had to have an ID card that was issued by the Miami Beach Police Department. It had your picture on it and your fingerprints. If you wanted to work on the Beach, you had to carry that card."1

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Black Miami in the Twentieth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • PART 1 5
  • 2 - Blacks in Early Miami (1896-1926) 51
  • 3 - Blacks in Early Dade County (1896-1926) 101
  • PART 2 141
  • 5 - The Dade County Civil Rights Movement (1944-1970) 171
  • 6 - School Desegregation 224
  • PART 3 243
  • 8 - Riots of the 1980s 267
  • PART 4 315
  • 10 - Current Status of Blacks in Dade County: An Overview 334
  • Index 393
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 414

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.