Black Miami in the Twentieth Century

By Marvin Dunn | Go to book overview

10 CURRENT STATUS OF BLACKS IN DADE COUNTY: AN OVERVIEW

By the year 2000 nearly a half-million black people will reside in Dade County. They will be very unlike those who came with the railroad in 1896. Blacks in Dade County today are better educated and hold better jobs than ever before. They are more ethnically diverse than ever before. They live in most sections of the county; and, relative to other racial groups, they have made steady progress on virtually all fronts. There are more black elected and appointed officials than anyone could have imagined in 1896. Even more will ascend to influence in the coming decades. Blacks are making steady gains in education and in income relative to other groups. However, black business development, although supported to some degree by the public sector with contracts and services, remains embryonic in comparison to white and Hispanic business growth.

In spite of significant black progress over the past century on Biscayne Bay, one-third of the black population of Dade County remains mired in poverty with little or no hope of escape. Poor black children in Dade County are worse off than ever; they are the poorest of the poor. Currently, popular social-welfare reforms are ominous to many poor blacks, and for good reason: The proposed reductions in public support will not make their lives better. The future of blacks in Miami, indeed the future of the city itself, depends in no small measure on its success in integrating this alienated segment of the community into the vibrant heart of the city in its second century.


Demographics

The black population of Dade County in 1930 was about 30,000; it had grown to more than 300,000 by the early 1980s and to 397,993 by 1990. The 1990 census shows 1,937,094 residents in Dade County and 358,548 in Miami. Of the Miamians, 98,207 (27 percent) were black. By the early 1980s, greater Miami became one of only sixteen metropolitan areas in the United States with more than 300,000 blacks. Between 1970 and 1980, Dade's black population grew by 47 percent, a growth rate exceeded only by that of Atlanta.1 For more than thirty years Dade's black population outpaced the growth of the total popu-

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Black Miami in the Twentieth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • PART 1 5
  • 2 - Blacks in Early Miami (1896-1926) 51
  • 3 - Blacks in Early Dade County (1896-1926) 101
  • PART 2 141
  • 5 - The Dade County Civil Rights Movement (1944-1970) 171
  • 6 - School Desegregation 224
  • PART 3 243
  • 8 - Riots of the 1980s 267
  • PART 4 315
  • 10 - Current Status of Blacks in Dade County: An Overview 334
  • Index 393
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