Black Miami in the Twentieth Century

By Marvin Dunn | Go to book overview

INDEX
Page numbers in italics refer to illustrations.
Aaron, Elijah, and McDuffie riot, 290
Abernathy, Rev. Ralph David, and 1968 riot, 249
Adams, Neal, and Brownsville Improvement Association, 169; indictment and trial of, 255-56; as Metro Commissioner, 255
Adker, Ann Marie, on heyday of Colored Town, 150; on Marcus Garvey movement, 126-27; on naming of Overtown, 151; on urban renewal in Overtown, 158
Adorno, Hank, 272-76
African Orthodox Churches: Saint Peter's Orthodox Catholic Church, 117; Saint Francis Xavier Church, 115, 179
Agriculture, and Bahamian blacks, 14, 36-37, 95-96; Brown wilt, 15; in Florida Keys, 14; and Great Freeze, 47; in Lemon City, 66; in South Dade, 71
Aimar, Octavius, as black officeholder in Reconstruction, 31
Alberta Heights, 84
Allapattah, 163; and current population, 341, 357
Alliance of blacks and Seminoles, 19- 27
Alvarez, Luis, charges against, 303; and Nevel Johnson shooting, 299; and Roy Black, 303; trial and verdict of, 303-5
Anderson, Sim, among first black Miami residents, 52, 54
Andrews, Fred, and chauffeur's dispute,
Artson, W. H., as early Miami registered voter, 58
Atkins, Judge Clyde C., 231-33; and Dade County school desegregation suit, 231; and faculty desegregation, 232; and pairing of schools, 233; and South Miami Heights suit, 232; school system declared unitary, 233
Austin, Silas, and charter of City of Miami, 58
Avenue D, as black business hub, 53, 60. See alsoMiami Avenue
Back-to- Africa movement in Miami, 124-27; and African Orthodox Church, 179; Anne Marie Adker on, 126; founded by Marcus Garvey, 124; goals of movement, 125; and James Bertram Nimmo, 124-26; also known as Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), 125
Bahamas, agricultural practices of, 36; economic collapse of, 15; migration of populace to Florida, 13-19, 95- 100
Bahamian blacks, and agricultural practices, 36-37; and Brooks incident, 99-100; known as Conchs, 14; and churches, 108, 111; and construction trades, 96; and economic exploitation of, 16; employment of, 13-14, 34-37, 63, 96-97; family life in late 1800s, 15; as farm laborers, 36-37, 95-97; and Fitzpatrick plantation, 28; and Goombay, 17; and Jonkonnu, 16; in Kebo (Coconut Grove), 35; in Lemon City, 32, 66; as

-393-

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Black Miami in the Twentieth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • PART 1 5
  • 2 - Blacks in Early Miami (1896-1926) 51
  • 3 - Blacks in Early Dade County (1896-1926) 101
  • PART 2 141
  • 5 - The Dade County Civil Rights Movement (1944-1970) 171
  • 6 - School Desegregation 224
  • PART 3 243
  • 8 - Riots of the 1980s 267
  • PART 4 315
  • 10 - Current Status of Blacks in Dade County: An Overview 334
  • Index 393
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